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The fall, and rise of civilian power Europe?

Whitman, Richard

Description

The central focus of this paper is the concept of ‘civilian power Europe’, which has been associated with the characterisation and examination of the international role of the EU for almost thirty years. The paper outlines the notion of civilian power Europe as originally formulated, examines how the idea has been used and adapted (or refuted) across time, and explores whether the idea has continuing utility in the early twenty-first century. Central to this analysis is a consideration of...[Show more]

dc.contributor.authorWhitman, Richard
dc.date.accessioned2003-05-20
dc.date.accessioned2004-05-19T16:21:20Z
dc.date.accessioned2011-01-05T08:49:45Z
dc.date.available2004-05-19T16:21:20Z
dc.date.available2011-01-05T08:49:45Z
dc.date.created2002
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/1885/41589
dc.description.abstractThe central focus of this paper is the concept of ‘civilian power Europe’, which has been associated with the characterisation and examination of the international role of the EU for almost thirty years. The paper outlines the notion of civilian power Europe as originally formulated, examines how the idea has been used and adapted (or refuted) across time, and explores whether the idea has continuing utility in the early twenty-first century. Central to this analysis is a consideration of whether the conception of civilian power Europe was undermined by the creation of the Common Foreign and Security Policy and the subsequent development of the Common European Security and Defence Policy. The paper concludes that civilian power Europe still has empirical and theoretical purchase when the EU is considered in the context of the contemporary international relations of Europe. It demonstrates the need to develop a clear conception of the international capabilities of the EU if appropriate forms of understanding of the international role of the EU are to be developed.
dc.format.extent1 vol.
dc.format.mimetypeapplication/pdf
dc.language.isoen_AU
dc.publisherNational Europe Centre (NEC), The Australian National University
dc.relation.ispartofseriesNational Europe Centre (NEC) Paper: No. 16
dc.rightsAuthor/s retain copyright
dc.subjectEuropean Union
dc.subjectcommon foreign and security policy
dc.subjectCFSP
dc.subjectcommon European security and defence policy
dc.subjectCESDP
dc.subjectinternational relations
dc.subjectcapability-expecations gap
dc.subjectCEG
dc.titleThe fall, and rise of civilian power Europe?
dc.typeWorking/Technical Paper
local.description.refereedno
local.identifier.citationmonthjul
local.identifier.citationyear2002
local.identifier.eprintid1318
local.rights.ispublishedno
local.type.statusPublished Version
local.contributor.affiliationANU
local.contributor.affiliationNational Europe Centre
dcterms.accessRightsOpen Access
CollectionsANU Centre for European Studies (ANUCES)

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