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A new paradigm of international migration between the European Union and Australia: patterns and implications

Hugo, Graeme

Description

International migration between the European Union (EU) and Australia has a long history. However, the pattern of this migrational flow has undergone some profound changes in the last decade. This paper provides an Australian-end perspective on these changes using the 2001 Census of Population and Housing, arrival/departure information and survey results to establish the nature and scale of these changes. Australia is recognised, along with Canada, the United States and New Zealand, as a...[Show more]

dc.contributor.authorHugo, Graeme
dc.date.accessioned2003-07-02
dc.date.accessioned2004-05-19T15:41:15Z
dc.date.accessioned2011-01-05T08:48:30Z
dc.date.available2004-05-19T15:41:15Z
dc.date.available2011-01-05T08:48:30Z
dc.date.created2003
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/1885/41481
dc.description.abstractInternational migration between the European Union (EU) and Australia has a long history. However, the pattern of this migrational flow has undergone some profound changes in the last decade. This paper provides an Australian-end perspective on these changes using the 2001 Census of Population and Housing, arrival/departure information and survey results to establish the nature and scale of these changes. Australia is recognised, along with Canada, the United States and New Zealand, as a ‘traditional country of immigration’ and the EU has been one of the largest single suppliers of settlers to Australia with 12 percent of Australians at the 2001 Census being born in the EU and a similar number being Australian-born with a EU-born parent. However, with the massive global shifts occurring in international migration, the migration relationship has become much more complex. On the one hand, Australia has entered a new paradigm of international migration in which non-permanent settlement movements have assumed central significance. The EU has been a major source of such people moving to Australia. There has long been a substantial counter flow of people moving from Australia to the EU among which former settlers have dominated. In recent years the numbers of Australian born moving on a permanent or long-term basis to the EU has increased substantially. It is argued that the bulk of research knowledge in Australia is based on the settlement paradigm which is now only a minor part of migration between Australia and Europe. There is a need to reorient research activity in Australia to encompass the new forms of movement. In addition to identifying the scale of the new forms of international migration influencing movements between the EU and Australia, trends in that movement and the composition of flows are explored. This paper traces a number of the policy implications which arise.
dc.format.extent1 vol.
dc.format.mimetypeapplication/pdf
dc.language.isoen_AU
dc.publisherNational Europe Centre (NEC), The Australian National University
dc.relation.ispartofseriesNational Europe Centre (NEC) Paper: No. 62
dc.rightsAuthor/s retain copyright
dc.subjectEU
dc.subjectEuropean Union
dc.subjectAustralia
dc.subjectEurope
dc.subjectimmigration
dc.subjectinternational migration
dc.subjectsettlement paradigm
dc.subjectmigration patterns
dc.subjectemigrants movements
dc.titleA new paradigm of international migration between the European Union and Australia: patterns and implications
dc.typeWorking/Technical Paper
local.description.notesThe Challenges of Immigration and Integration in the European Union and Australia, University of Sydney, Sydney, Australia
local.description.refereedno
local.identifier.citationmonthfeb
local.identifier.citationyear2003
local.identifier.eprintid1541
local.rights.ispublishedno
local.type.statusPublished Version
local.contributor.affiliationNational Europe Centre
local.contributor.affiliationANU
dcterms.accessRightsOpen Access
CollectionsANU Centre for European Studies (ANUCES)

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