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Bondaian technology in the Hunter Valley, New South Wales

Hiscock, Peter

Description

Manufacture of bondi points in the Hunter valley, New South Wales, took place in a standardized way, within a production-line structure. Each stage of the manufacturing activities was undertaken at a different locality, but within any single stage the activities were carried out in a uniform manner. One consequence of this complex system of procurement and reduction is that specific forms of stone artefact are found repeatedly, and have previously been identified as implement types. From a...[Show more]

dc.contributor.authorHiscock, Peter
dc.date.accessioned2003-10-02
dc.date.accessioned2004-05-19T15:32:36Z
dc.date.accessioned2011-01-05T08:47:58Z
dc.date.available2004-05-19T15:32:36Z
dc.date.available2011-01-05T08:47:58Z
dc.date.created1993
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/1885/41387
dc.identifier.urihttp://digitalcollections.anu.edu.au/handle/1885/41387
dc.description.abstractManufacture of bondi points in the Hunter valley, New South Wales, took place in a standardized way, within a production-line structure. Each stage of the manufacturing activities was undertaken at a different locality, but within any single stage the activities were carried out in a uniform manner. One consequence of this complex system of procurement and reduction is that specific forms of stone artefact are found repeatedly, and have previously been identified as implement types. From a technological perspective these forms (ridge-straightening flakes, scrapers, and burinates) are not end products, but by-products from the manufacture of bondi points. This conclusion has implications for evaluations of the nature and diversity of activities represented by archaeological assemblages. An understanding of the complexity of artefact manufacture also highlights inadequacies with previous inferences about technological efficiency and artefact function in prehistoric Australia. Flake elongation in demonstrated to be a poor reflectiion of technological practices, and regional variation in flake elongation is far more dramatic than chronological variation. Consequently, the Pre-Bondaian transistion cannot be described in terms of the appearance of a blade technology; instead it represents an increase in the regularity and precision of knapping related to raw material conservation.
dc.format.extent774985 bytes
dc.format.extent356 bytes
dc.format.mimetypeapplication/pdf
dc.format.mimetypeapplication/octet-stream
dc.language.isoen_AU
dc.subjectBondaian technology
dc.subjectHunter Valley
dc.subjectbondi points
dc.subjectarchaeological assemblages
dc.subjectartefact manufacture
dc.subjectflake elongation
dc.subjectchronological variation
dc.subjectblade technology
dc.subjectknapping precision
dc.subjectraw material conservation
dc.subjectprehistoric Australia
dc.titleBondaian technology in the Hunter Valley, New South Wales
dc.typeJournal article
local.description.refereedyes
local.identifier.citationnumber2
local.identifier.citationpages64-75
local.identifier.citationpublicationArchaeology in Oceania
local.identifier.citationvolume28
local.identifier.citationyear1993
local.identifier.eprintid2060
local.rights.ispublishedyes
dc.date.issued1993
CollectionsANU Research Publications

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