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Cross-sectional anthropometry: what can it tell us about the health of young children

McMurray, Christine

Description

It has become common practice in health surveys to collect anthropometric measurements from young children. These datasets comprise one-point-in-time measurements for a number of children, and are very different in character from longitudinal data such as those collected during growth monitoring. This paper explores the nature of cross-sectional data, their applications and their limitations, using sample data from Burundi, Uganda and Zimbabwe. Methods of analysis which treat the data as...[Show more]

dc.contributor.authorMcMurray, Christine
dc.contributor.editorCaldwell, John C.
dc.contributor.editorJain, Shail
dc.date.accessioned2003-03-05
dc.date.accessioned2004-05-19T15:25:05Z
dc.date.accessioned2011-01-05T08:47:06Z
dc.date.available2004-05-19T15:25:05Z
dc.date.available2011-01-05T08:47:06Z
dc.date.created1996
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/1885/41309
dc.identifier.urihttp://digitalcollections.anu.edu.au/handle/1885/41309
dc.description.abstractIt has become common practice in health surveys to collect anthropometric measurements from young children. These datasets comprise one-point-in-time measurements for a number of children, and are very different in character from longitudinal data such as those collected during growth monitoring. This paper explores the nature of cross-sectional data, their applications and their limitations, using sample data from Burundi, Uganda and Zimbabwe. Methods of analysis which treat the data as continuous or dichotomous are compared. The conclusion is that crosssectional data can make a valuable contribution to health research provided their application and interpretation are properly understood.
dc.format.extent72402 bytes
dc.format.mimetypeapplication/pdf
dc.language.isoen_AU
dc.publisherHealth Transition Centre, National Centre for Epidemiology and Population Health, The Australian National University
dc.subjectcross-sectional anthropometry
dc.subjecthealth
dc.subjectyoung children
dc.subjectBurundi
dc.subjectUganda
dc.subjectZimbabwe
dc.subjectchild growth
dc.titleCross-sectional anthropometry: what can it tell us about the health of young children
dc.typeJournal article
local.description.refereedno
local.identifier.citationmonthoct
local.identifier.citationnumber2
local.identifier.citationpages147-168
local.identifier.citationpublicationHealth Transition Review
local.identifier.citationvolume6
local.identifier.citationyear1996
local.identifier.eprintid878
local.rights.ispublishedno
dc.date.issued1996
CollectionsANU Research Publications

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