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Carrots and sticks - inspection strategies in Denmark

Jenson, Per Langaa; Jenson, Jens

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Introduction: The duty to assure safe and healthy working condition will always have people in enterprises as the primary actors. They might consult external agencies, but they will never be able to handle the obligation to assure the working environment in an enterprise. This is recognized in the Danish law on working environment. In the preamble the parliament has stated that: This law has in view to create…the foundation for enterprises to solve questions concerning safety and health under...[Show more]

dc.contributor.authorJenson, Per Langaa
dc.contributor.authorJenson, Jens
dc.date.accessioned2003-10-27
dc.date.accessioned2004-05-19T15:11:29Z
dc.date.accessioned2011-01-05T08:46:21Z
dc.date.available2004-05-19T15:11:29Z
dc.date.available2011-01-05T08:46:21Z
dc.date.created2003
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/1885/41222
dc.identifier.urihttp://digitalcollections.anu.edu.au/handle/1885/41222
dc.description.abstractIntroduction: The duty to assure safe and healthy working condition will always have people in enterprises as the primary actors. They might consult external agencies, but they will never be able to handle the obligation to assure the working environment in an enterprise. This is recognized in the Danish law on working environment. In the preamble the parliament has stated that: This law has in view to create…the foundation for enterprises to solve questions concerning safety and health under guidance from the labour market organizations and guidance and supervision from the labour inspectorate (AML, 1999, our translation) More studies have shown that most enterprises have difficulties in fulfilling the intentions of the law unassisted (Jensen, 2001). More external agencies have explicitly been singled out as having a supportive role by the parliament: the labour inspectorate (officially named National Working Environment Authority of Denmark), the labour market parties and the occupational health services. More studies have addressed the functioning of the occupational health services and the effects of the systems in specific areas (monotonous work and chemical substances). This paper addresses the role of the labor inspectorate in relation to the enterprises as it has developed since the law was passed. The perspective taken emphasizes the strategic decisions taken and the implementations of these decisions. But first ‘the scene’ for regulating working environment in Denmark has to be established.
dc.format.extent84734 bytes
dc.format.extent361 bytes
dc.format.mimetypeapplication/pdf
dc.format.mimetypeapplication/octet-stream
dc.language.isoen_AU
dc.subjectOHS
dc.subjectoccupational health and safety
dc.subjectDenmark
dc.subjectregulation strategy
dc.subjecttargeted inspections
dc.subjectinternal control
dc.subjectsystem inspection
dc.subjectworking environment
dc.titleCarrots and sticks - inspection strategies in Denmark
dc.typeWorking/Technical Paper
local.description.notesThis paper was first presented at the conference Australian OHS Regulation for the 21st Century, National Research Centre for Occupational Health and Safety Regulation & National Occupational Health and Safety Commission, Gold Coast, July 20-22, 2003.
local.description.refereedno
local.identifier.citationmonthjul
local.identifier.citationyear2003
local.identifier.eprintid2182
local.rights.ispublishedyes
dc.date.issued2003
local.contributor.affiliationNational Research Centre for OHS Regulation
local.contributor.affiliationANU
local.citationWorking Paper 12
CollectionsANU Research Publications

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