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The health transition: the cultural inflation of morbidity during the decline of mortality

Johansson, Sheila Ryan

Description

It has become commonplace to observe that as mortality falls, morbidity levels rise. The question is why? The explanation offered here stresses the multidimensional nature of morbidity, and the important role that diverse cultural forces have on the patterns of behaviour which underlie reporting behaviour during modernization. These forces involve rising health expectations on the part of ordinary people, including their ability to perceive illness and their willingness to seek professional...[Show more]

dc.contributor.authorJohansson, Sheila Ryan
dc.date.accessioned2002-04-12
dc.date.accessioned2004-05-19T14:52:12Z
dc.date.accessioned2011-01-05T08:46:00Z
dc.date.available2004-05-19T14:52:12Z
dc.date.available2011-01-05T08:46:00Z
dc.date.created1991
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/1885/41184
dc.identifier.urihttp://digitalcollections.anu.edu.au/handle/1885/41184
dc.description.abstractIt has become commonplace to observe that as mortality falls, morbidity levels rise. The question is why? The explanation offered here stresses the multidimensional nature of morbidity, and the important role that diverse cultural forces have on the patterns of behaviour which underlie reporting behaviour during modernization. These forces involve rising health expectations on the part of ordinary people, including their ability to perceive illness and their willingness to seek professional help, and institutional pressures on medical professionals which reward them for discovering and treating an ever-growing set of non-fatal diseases. Since non-Western developing countries are training physicians to practice scientific medicine, are educating their citizens to think about disease along modern lines, and measure morbidity as developed countries do, there is every reason to suppose that as mortality falls in these countries, morbidity will rise, just as it has done in the developed world.
dc.format.extent90608 bytes
dc.format.mimetypeapplication/pdf
dc.language.isoen_AU
dc.publisherNational Centre for Epidemiology and Population Health, The Australian National University
dc.subjecthealth transition
dc.subjectmorbidity
dc.subjectmortality
dc.subjectdisease
dc.titleThe health transition: the cultural inflation of morbidity during the decline of mortality
dc.typeJournal article
local.description.refereedno
local.identifier.citationmonthapr
local.identifier.citationnumber1
local.identifier.citationpages39-65
local.identifier.citationpublicationHealth Transition Review
local.identifier.citationvolume1
local.identifier.citationyear1991
local.identifier.eprintid256
local.rights.ispublishedyes
dc.date.issued1991
CollectionsANU Research Publications

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