Skip navigation
Skip navigation

Challenges for global environmental diplomacy in Australia and the European Union

Papadakis, Elim

Description

One of the predominant issues on the agenda of diplomats and politicians is how to address the consequences of shifts in perception about threats to the environment and the actual short and long-term characteristics and effects of environmental degradation. Another challenge is that such issues as climate change impact on many areas including trade, economic and fiscal policies, employment, transport, agriculture and regional development. Furthermore, decisions taken at a national level cannot...[Show more]

dc.contributor.authorPapadakis, Elim
dc.date.accessioned2003-05-29
dc.date.accessioned2004-05-19T13:31:23Z
dc.date.accessioned2011-01-05T08:36:50Z
dc.date.available2004-05-19T13:31:23Z
dc.date.available2011-01-05T08:36:50Z
dc.date.created2002
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/1885/41009
dc.description.abstractOne of the predominant issues on the agenda of diplomats and politicians is how to address the consequences of shifts in perception about threats to the environment and the actual short and long-term characteristics and effects of environmental degradation. Another challenge is that such issues as climate change impact on many areas including trade, economic and fiscal policies, employment, transport, agriculture and regional development. Furthermore, decisions taken at a national level cannot be isolated from international concerns, as in the case of the Kyoto Protocol. This paper maps out some of the differences between Australia and such transnational organizations as the European Union, be they in relation to the role of developing countries in tackling climate change, the use of market mechanisms to tackle environmental problems and the implementation of punitive compliance systems. The paper explores why on some issues Australia and the EU might be perceived as either leaders and pioneers or laggards. The paper also looks beyond the binary coding of ‘laggards’ versus ‘leaders’ to some striking parallels between the two jurisdictions in their efforts to achieve sustainable development, ecological modernisation and introduce new environmental policy instruments as well as in similar pressures arising from changes in value systems over the past four decades. The paper is organized around four themes: challenges facing both Australia and the EU; why the EU is regarded as a global leader; how Australia has engaged with sustainable development; and how commonalities are more striking than differences.
dc.format.extent1 vol.
dc.format.mimetypeapplication/pdf
dc.language.isoen_AU
dc.publisherNational Europe Centre (NEC), The Australian National University
dc.relation.ispartofseriesNational Europe Centre (NEC) Paper: No. 21
dc.rightsAuthor/s retain copyright
dc.subjectsustainable development
dc.subjectecological modernisation
dc.subjectpioneers
dc.subjectlaggards
dc.subjectenvironmental policy
dc.subjectEuropean Union
dc.subjectEU
dc.subjectAustralia
dc.subjectKyoto Protocol
dc.subjectenvironmental diplomacy
dc.titleChallenges for global environmental diplomacy in Australia and the European Union
dc.typeWorking/Technical Paper
local.description.refereedno
local.identifier.citationmonthjul
local.identifier.citationyear2002
local.identifier.eprintid1380
local.rights.ispublishedno
local.type.statusPublished Version
local.contributor.affiliationNational Europe Centre
local.contributor.affiliationANU
dcterms.accessRightsOpen Access
CollectionsANU Centre for European Studies (ANUCES)

Download

File Description SizeFormat Image
papadakis.pdf249.89 kBAdobe PDFThumbnail


Items in Open Research are protected by copyright, with all rights reserved, unless otherwise indicated.

Updated:  22 January 2019/ Responsible Officer:  University Librarian/ Page Contact:  Library Systems & Web Coordinator