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Reducing poverty and inequality in India: has liberalization helped?

Raghbendra, Jha

Description

This study examines the empirical relationship among inequality, poverty and economic growth in India. Using data on consumption from the 13th to the 55th Rounds of the National Sample Survey, the author computes, for both rural and urban sectors, the Gini coefficient and three popular measures of poverty. The observed changes in inequality and poverty are explained in terms of the behaviour of key macroeconomic aggregates. A sharp rise in rural and, particularly, urban inequality and only a...[Show more]

dc.contributor.authorRaghbendra, Jha
dc.contributor.editorGiovanni Andrea Cornia
dc.date.accessioned2003-08-06
dc.date.accessioned2004-05-19T05:32:36Z
dc.date.accessioned2011-01-05T08:26:41Z
dc.date.available2004-05-19T05:32:36Z
dc.date.available2011-01-05T08:26:41Z
dc.date.created2002
dc.identifier.isbn0199271410
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/1885/40129
dc.identifier.urihttp://digitalcollections.anu.edu.au/handle/1885/40129
dc.description.abstractThis study examines the empirical relationship among inequality, poverty and economic growth in India. Using data on consumption from the 13th to the 55th Rounds of the National Sample Survey, the author computes, for both rural and urban sectors, the Gini coefficient and three popular measures of poverty. The observed changes in inequality and poverty are explained in terms of the behaviour of key macroeconomic aggregates. A sharp rise in rural and, particularly, urban inequality and only a marginal decline in poverty have characterized the post-reform period. The rise in inequality is explained in terms of an increase in the relative share of output going to capital as compared to labour, a drop in the rate of labour absorption and the rapid growth of the services sector. The rise in inequality has diminished the poverty-reducing effects of higher growth. The reforms have also been characterized by widening regional inequality. This is especially yes in the case of the incidence of rural poverty, but also, to a lesser extent, urban poverty. Statistical convergence among states in terms of inequality, poverty and real mean consumption is weak. Several policy conclusions are advanced.
dc.format.extent164419 bytes
dc.format.extent360 bytes
dc.format.mimetypeapplication/pdf
dc.format.mimetypeapplication/octet-stream
dc.language.isoen_AU
dc.publisherOxford University Press
dc.relation.ispartofInequality, Growth, and Poverty in an Era of Liberalization and Globalization
dc.relation.isversionofFirst Edition
dc.subjectpolicy reforms
dc.subjectinequality
dc.subjectIndia
dc.subjectpoverty
dc.subjectliberalization
dc.subjectindustrial policy
dc.subjectforeign investment
dc.subjecttrade
dc.subjecteconomic reforms
dc.subjectGini
dc.subjecteconomic performance
dc.titleReducing poverty and inequality in India: has liberalization helped?
dc.typeWorking/Technical Paper
local.description.refereedno
local.identifier.citationyear2002
local.identifier.eprintid1812
local.rights.ispublishedno
local.identifier.absfor140202 - Economic Development and Growth
local.identifier.absfor140219 - Welfare Economics
local.identifier.ariespublicationMigratedxPub9266
local.type.statusPublished Version
local.contributor.affiliationEconomics, RSPAS
local.contributor.affiliationANU
local.citationWorking papers in Trade and Development no.2002/04
local.bibliographicCitation.startpage297
local.bibliographicCitation.lastpage326
dc.date.updated2015-12-11T10:42:16Z
local.bibliographicCitation.placeofpublicationNew York, United States
CollectionsANU Research Publications

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