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When do Stereotypes Become Really Consensual? Investigating the Group-Based Dynamics of the Consensualization Process

Haslam, S A; Turner, John C; Oakes, Penelope J.; Reynolds, Katherine J; Eggins, Rachael; Nolan, Mark; Tweedie, Janet

Description

Although it has long been recognized that stereotypes achieve much of their force from being shared by members of social groups, relatively little empirical work has examined the process by which such consensus is reached. This paper tests predictions derived from self-categorization theory that stereotype consensus will be enhanced (a) by factors which make the shared social identity of perceivers salient and (b) by group interaction that is premised upon that shared identity. In Experiment 1...[Show more]

dc.contributor.authorHaslam, S A
dc.contributor.authorTurner, John C
dc.contributor.authorOakes, Penelope J.
dc.contributor.authorReynolds, Katherine J
dc.contributor.authorEggins, Rachael
dc.contributor.authorNolan, Mark
dc.contributor.authorTweedie, Janet
dc.date.accessioned2015-12-10T21:57:38Z
dc.identifier.issn0046-2772
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/1885/39869
dc.description.abstractAlthough it has long been recognized that stereotypes achieve much of their force from being shared by members of social groups, relatively little empirical work has examined the process by which such consensus is reached. This paper tests predictions derived from self-categorization theory that stereotype consensus will be enhanced (a) by factors which make the shared social identity of perceivers salient and (b) by group interaction that is premised upon that shared identity. In Experiment 1 (N = 40) the consensus of ingroup stereotypes is enhanced where an ingroup is judged after (rather than before) an outgroup. In Experiment 2 (N = 80) when only one group is judged, group interaction is shown to enhance the consensus of outgroup stereotypes more than those of the ingroup - an apparent 'outgroup consensus effect'. In Experiment 3 (N = 135) this asymmetry is extinguished and group interaction found to produce equally high consensus in both ingroup and outgroup stereotypes when the ingroup is explicitly contrasted from an outgroup. Implications for alternative models of consensus development are discussed.
dc.publisherJohn Wiley & Sons Inc
dc.sourceEuropean Journal of Social Psychology
dc.titleWhen do Stereotypes Become Really Consensual? Investigating the Group-Based Dynamics of the Consensualization Process
dc.typeJournal article
local.description.notesImported from ARIES
local.identifier.citationvolume28
dc.date.issued1998
local.identifier.absfor170113 - Social and Community Psychology
local.identifier.ariespublicationu9507981xPUB184
local.type.statusPublished Version
local.contributor.affiliationHaslam, S A, College of Medicine, Biology and Environment, ANU
local.contributor.affiliationTurner, John C, College of Medicine, Biology and Environment, ANU
local.contributor.affiliationOakes, Penelope J., Administrative Division, ANU
local.contributor.affiliationReynolds, Katherine J, College of Medicine, Biology and Environment, ANU
local.contributor.affiliationEggins, Rachael, College of Medicine, Biology and Environment, ANU
local.contributor.affiliationNolan, Mark, ANU College of Law, ANU
local.contributor.affiliationTweedie, Janet, College of Medicine, Biology and Environment, ANU
local.description.embargo2037-12-31
local.bibliographicCitation.startpage755
local.bibliographicCitation.lastpage776
dc.date.updated2015-12-09T07:47:26Z
local.identifier.scopusID2-s2.0-0032356155
CollectionsANU Research Publications

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