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Implications of new early Homo fossils from Ileret, east of Lake Turkana, Kenya

Spoor, Fed; Leakey, Meave; Gathogo, P; Brown, F H; Anton, Susan C; McDougall, Ian; Kiarie, Christopher; Manthi, F K; Leakey, Louise

Description

Sites in eastern Africa have shed light on the emergence and early evolution of the genus Homo. The best known early hominin species, H. habilis and H. erectus, have often been interpreted as time-successive segments of a single anagenetic evolutionary lineage. The case for this was strengthened by the discovery of small early Pleistocene hominin crania from Dmanisi in Georgia that apparently provide evidence of morphological continuity between the two taxa. Here we describe two new cranial...[Show more]

dc.contributor.authorSpoor, Fed
dc.contributor.authorLeakey, Meave
dc.contributor.authorGathogo, P
dc.contributor.authorBrown, F H
dc.contributor.authorAnton, Susan C
dc.contributor.authorMcDougall, Ian
dc.contributor.authorKiarie, Christopher
dc.contributor.authorManthi, F K
dc.contributor.authorLeakey, Louise
dc.date.accessioned2015-12-10T21:57:38Z
dc.identifier.issn0028-0836
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/1885/39868
dc.description.abstractSites in eastern Africa have shed light on the emergence and early evolution of the genus Homo. The best known early hominin species, H. habilis and H. erectus, have often been interpreted as time-successive segments of a single anagenetic evolutionary lineage. The case for this was strengthened by the discovery of small early Pleistocene hominin crania from Dmanisi in Georgia that apparently provide evidence of morphological continuity between the two taxa. Here we describe two new cranial fossils from the Koobi Fora Formation, east of Lake Turkana in Kenya, that have bearing on the relationship between species of early Homo. A partial maxilla assigned to H. habilis reliably demonstrates that this species survived until later than previously recognized, making an anagenetic relationship with H. erectus unlikely. The discovery of a particularly small calvaria of H. erectus indicates that this taxon overlapped in size with H. habilis, and may have shown marked sexual dimorphism. The new fossils confirm the distinctiveness of H. habilis and H. erectus, independently of overall cranial size, and suggest that these two early taxa were living broadly sympatrically in the same lake basin for almost half a million years.
dc.publisherMacmillan Publishers Ltd
dc.sourceNature
dc.subjectKeywords: cranium; evolution; fossil record; hominid; morphology; new record; Pleistocene; sexual dimorphism; article; calvaria; correlation analysis; fossil; hominid; Kenya; lake; maxilla; nonhuman; priority journal; skull; taxon; Animals; Ecosystem; Female; Fossi
dc.titleImplications of new early Homo fossils from Ileret, east of Lake Turkana, Kenya
dc.typeJournal article
local.description.notesImported from ARIES
local.identifier.citationvolume448
dc.date.issued2007
local.identifier.absfor040303 - Geochronology
local.identifier.absfor040313 - Tectonics
local.identifier.ariespublicationu9503261xPUB184
local.type.statusPublished Version
local.contributor.affiliationSpoor, Fed, University College London
local.contributor.affiliationLeakey, Meave, National Museums of Kenya
local.contributor.affiliationGathogo, P, University of Utah
local.contributor.affiliationBrown, F H, University of Utah
local.contributor.affiliationAnton, Susan C, New York University
local.contributor.affiliationMcDougall, Ian, College of Physical and Mathematical Sciences, ANU
local.contributor.affiliationKiarie, Christopher, National Museums of Kenya
local.contributor.affiliationManthi, F K, National Museums of Kenya
local.contributor.affiliationLeakey, Louise, National Museums of Kenya
local.description.embargo2037-12-31
local.bibliographicCitation.startpage688
local.bibliographicCitation.lastpage691
local.identifier.doi10.1038/nature05986
dc.date.updated2015-12-09T07:47:25Z
local.identifier.scopusID2-s2.0-34547798464
CollectionsANU Research Publications

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