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Is homeownership the answer? Housing tenure and Indigenous Australians in remote (and settled) areas

Sanders, Will

Description

This paper examines the relevance of recently floated policy ideas for extending homeownership to remote Aboriginal Australians. It argues that while the housing tenure system in more densely settled Australia is dominated by homeownership, this is not, and cannot realistically be expected to be, the case in remote areas. The paper uses data from the 2001 Census, organized by remoteness geography, to demonstrate the different character of the housing tenure system in remote Australia. The paper...[Show more]

dc.contributor.authorSanders, Will
dc.date.accessioned2015-12-10T21:56:17Z
dc.date.created2008
dc.identifier.issn0267-3037
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/1885/39351
dc.description.abstractThis paper examines the relevance of recently floated policy ideas for extending homeownership to remote Aboriginal Australians. It argues that while the housing tenure system in more densely settled Australia is dominated by homeownership, this is not, and cannot realistically be expected to be, the case in remote areas. The paper uses data from the 2001 Census, organized by remoteness geography, to demonstrate the different character of the housing tenure system in remote Australia. The paper argues that homeownership in remote Aboriginal communities is a somewhat unrealistic policy goal, given the underlying income and employment status of Indigenous people in these communities. The paper also argues that there are better measures of Indigenous housing need and disadvantage in Australia than low homeownership rates. It briefly reports on one past failed experiment in Queensland to introduce homeownership to a remote Aboriginal community.
dc.format.mimetypeapplication/pdf
dc.language.isoen_AU
dc.publisherCarfax Publishing, Taylor & Francis Group
dc.sourceHousing Studies
dc.subjectemployment; homeownership; housing policy; income; indigenous population; policy analysis; tenure system; Australasia; Australia Employment status; Home ownership; Income; Indigenous Australians; Remote areas
dc.titleIs homeownership the answer? Housing tenure and Indigenous Australians in remote (and settled) areas
dc.typeJournal article
local.description.notesImported from ARIES
local.identifier.citationvolume23
local.identifier.absfor160510 - Public Policy
local.identifier.absfor120503 - Housing Markets, Development, Management
local.identifier.absfor169902 - Studies of Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander Society
local.identifier.ariespublicationu8100238xPUB175
local.type.statusPublished Version
local.contributor.affiliationSanders, William, College of Arts and Social Sciences, ANU
local.description.embargo2037-12-31
local.bibliographicCitation.issue3
local.bibliographicCitation.startpage433
local.bibliographicCitation.lastpage460
local.identifier.doi10.1080/02673030802030014
local.identifier.absseo940102 - Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander Development and Welfare
dc.date.updated2015-12-09T07:35:54Z
local.identifier.scopusID2-s2.0-46249094652
local.identifier.thomsonID000256530900004
CollectionsANU Research Publications

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