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Stability and change in level of probable depression and depressive symptoms in a sample of middle and older-aged adults

Butterworth, Peter; Luszcz, Mary A; Burns, Richard; Anstey, Kaarin

Description

Background: Findings from studies investigating depression in adults in late life are mixed due to a lack of large longitudinal studies with the power necessary to yield reliable estimates of stability or change. We examined the long-term stability of probable depression and depressive symptomology over a 13-year period in the Dynamic Analyses to Optimize Ageing (DYNOPTA) project. Methods: Community-living participants (N = 35,200) were aged 45-103 at baseline, predominantly female (79%),...[Show more]

dc.contributor.authorButterworth, Peter
dc.contributor.authorLuszcz, Mary A
dc.contributor.authorBurns, Richard
dc.contributor.authorAnstey, Kaarin
dc.date.accessioned2015-12-10T21:55:58Z
dc.date.available2015-12-10T21:55:58Z
dc.identifier.issn1041-6102
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/1885/39205
dc.description.abstractBackground: Findings from studies investigating depression in adults in late life are mixed due to a lack of large longitudinal studies with the power necessary to yield reliable estimates of stability or change. We examined the long-term stability of probable depression and depressive symptomology over a 13-year period in the Dynamic Analyses to Optimize Ageing (DYNOPTA) project. Methods: Community-living participants (N = 35,200) were aged 45-103 at baseline, predominantly female (79%), partnered (73%), and educated to secondary school only (61%) and followed for up to 13 years. Results: At baseline, increased age was associated with lower prevalence of probable depression and depressive symptomology. Over time, prevalence of probable depression was stable while levels of depressive symptomology reported a small decline. However, this finding was not consistent for all age groups; there was evidence for increasing levels of depressive symptomology, but not probable depression, as individuals aged. This effect was particularly notable among males aged 70 plus years. Conclusions: These results answer important questions relating to the longitudinal prevalence of probable depression and depressive symptomology in a sample of older Australians. These findings have policy implications for mental health service provision for older adults.
dc.publisherSpringer
dc.sourceInternational Psychogeriatrics
dc.subjectKeywords: adult; aged; article; community living; depression; educational status; female; follow up; groups by age; human; human experiment; male; prevalence; sex difference; symptom; Age Factors; Aged; Aged, 80 and over; Australia; Depression; Depressive Disorder; depression; longitudinal studies; psychogeriatrics
dc.titleStability and change in level of probable depression and depressive symptoms in a sample of middle and older-aged adults
dc.typeJournal article
local.description.notesImported from ARIES
local.identifier.citationvolume25
dc.date.issued2013
local.identifier.absfor170100 - PSYCHOLOGY
local.identifier.ariespublicationu4056230xPUB173
local.type.statusPublished Version
local.contributor.affiliationBurns, Richard, College of Medicine, Biology and Environment, ANU
local.contributor.affiliationButterworth, Peter, College of Medicine, Biology and Environment, ANU
local.contributor.affiliationLuszcz, Mary A, Flinders University
local.contributor.affiliationAnstey, Kaarin, College of Medicine, Biology and Environment, ANU
local.bibliographicCitation.issue2
local.bibliographicCitation.startpage303
local.bibliographicCitation.lastpage309
local.identifier.doi10.1017/S1041610212001470
local.identifier.absseo920502 - Health Related to Ageing
dc.date.updated2016-02-24T10:33:33Z
local.identifier.scopusID2-s2.0-84871505819
local.identifier.thomsonID000312529100017
CollectionsANU Research Publications

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