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Job variation in Australian advanced training in neurology

Lueck, Christian; Morris, J; Pepper, E

Description

Background: Like training posts in other medical specialties, many of the 38 Australian core training posts in neurology have been criticized over a variety of issues relating to the quality of training provided. These issues include excessive hours of work (often related to understaffing), high inpatient workload and inadequate exposure to outpatients and/or specialist procedures. To examine these issues, we conducted an audit of Australian advanced training posts in neurology to obtain...[Show more]

dc.contributor.authorLueck, Christian
dc.contributor.authorMorris, J
dc.contributor.authorPepper, E
dc.date.accessioned2015-12-10T21:54:12Z
dc.identifier.issn1444-0903
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/1885/38833
dc.description.abstractBackground: Like training posts in other medical specialties, many of the 38 Australian core training posts in neurology have been criticized over a variety of issues relating to the quality of training provided. These issues include excessive hours of work (often related to understaffing), high inpatient workload and inadequate exposure to outpatients and/or specialist procedures. To examine these issues, we conducted an audit of Australian advanced training posts in neurology to obtain baseline data. Methods: Two questionnaires were sent out, one to each head of department and another to the advanced trainees currently in post, requesting information about each of the training posts. The posts were compared with each other on an individual basis and by grouping them into three geographically related groups. Results: There was complete ascertainment and a wide variation in most of the measures examined, including inpatient and ward consult numbers, staffing levels, general neurological and specialist outpatient clinic exposure and overtime requirements. Exposure to neurophysiology clinics and training in electroencephalogram was more uniform. Conclusion: Core advanced training jobs in neurology vary considerably across Australia, largely for historical reasons. This situation is suboptimal for many reasons. Training jobs ideally need to be modified to take into account the changing needs of trainees rather than just the service requirements of the various departments, but there are many resource issues involved in achieving this.
dc.publisherBlackwell Science Asia
dc.sourceInternal Medicine Journal
dc.subjectKeywords: article; Australia; electroencephalogram; human; personnel shortage; physician; priority journal; questionnaire; staff training; work; work schedule; workload; Australia; Education, Medical, Graduate; Educational Measurement; Hospitals, Teaching; Humans; Education; Neurology; Physician training; Questionnaire survey
dc.titleJob variation in Australian advanced training in neurology
dc.typeJournal article
local.description.notesImported from ARIES
local.identifier.citationvolume38
dc.date.issued2008
local.identifier.absfor119999 - Medical and Health Sciences not elsewhere classified
local.identifier.ariespublicationu4241283xPUB167
local.type.statusPublished Version
local.contributor.affiliationLueck, Christian, College of Medicine, Biology and Environment, ANU
local.contributor.affiliationMorris, J, Westmead Hospital
local.contributor.affiliationPepper, E, Westmead Hospital
local.description.embargo2037-12-31
local.bibliographicCitation.startpage549
local.bibliographicCitation.lastpage558
local.identifier.doi10.1111/j.1445-5994.2007.01584.x
dc.date.updated2015-12-09T07:24:30Z
local.identifier.scopusID2-s2.0-48249139425
local.identifier.thomsonID000257709200003
CollectionsANU Research Publications

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