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Could better jobs improve mental health? A prospective study of change in work conditions and mental health in mid-age adults

Strazdins, Lyndall; D'Souza, Rennie; Clements, Mark; Broom, Dorothy; Berry, Helen; Rodgers, Bryan

Description

Objectives: To investigate the extent improvement or deterioration in employee job security, control or workload is associated with a change in mental health. Design Self-report panel data (2000, 2004) on mental health (symptoms of depression and generalised anxiety) and job demands, control and insecurity. Changes in exposures and outcomes were calculated by subtracting wave 1 from wave 2 scores. Changes in mental health were regressed onto changes in work conditions, adjusting for...[Show more]

dc.contributor.authorStrazdins, Lyndall
dc.contributor.authorD'Souza, Rennie
dc.contributor.authorClements, Mark
dc.contributor.authorBroom, Dorothy
dc.contributor.authorBerry, Helen
dc.contributor.authorRodgers, Bryan
dc.date.accessioned2015-12-10T21:53:54Z
dc.identifier.issn0143-005X
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/1885/38706
dc.description.abstractObjectives: To investigate the extent improvement or deterioration in employee job security, control or workload is associated with a change in mental health. Design Self-report panel data (2000, 2004) on mental health (symptoms of depression and generalised anxiety) and job demands, control and insecurity. Changes in exposures and outcomes were calculated by subtracting wave 1 from wave 2 scores. Changes in mental health were regressed onto changes in work conditions, adjusting for confounders. Sensitivity analyses assessed reverse causation, floor and ceiling effects. Setting Two adjoining cities in south-east Australia. Participants: 1975 employees aged 40-48 years, 50% (n=995) male. Results: Improvements and deterioration in each work condition were associated with corresponding improvements or deterioration in mental health. The association between changes in job insecurity and symptoms of depression was B=0.386 (95% CI 0.245 to 0.527) and with anxiety symptoms was B=0.434 (95% CI 0.267 to 0.601). Similarly, changes in job control were associated with changes in depressive (B=-0.548; 95% CI -0.791 to -0.304) and anxiety symptoms (B=-0.608; 95% CI -0.896 to- 0.319) as were changes in job demands (B depression=0.386; 95% CI 0.245 to 0.527; B anxiety=0.434; 95% CI 0.267 to 0.601). Excluding people with severe symptoms at baseline did not alter the findings; however, path analyses indicated that depression may precede a worsening of work conditions. Conclusion: Among mid-aged employees, deteriorating work conditions may amplify population health burdens, especially anxiety. Furthermore, better quality jobs, combining an array of positive conditions, could alleviate major population health burdens.
dc.publisherBritish Medical Association
dc.sourceJournal of Epidemiology and Community Health
dc.subjectKeywords: baseline conditions; health risk; mental health; public health; sensitivity analysis; symptom; unemployment; adult; article; Australia; employment; female; human; job satisfaction; male; mental health; middle aged; personnel management; prospective study;
dc.titleCould better jobs improve mental health? A prospective study of change in work conditions and mental health in mid-age adults
dc.typeJournal article
local.description.notesImported from ARIES
local.identifier.citationvolume65
dc.date.issued2011
local.identifier.absfor111714 - Mental Health
local.identifier.ariespublicationu4468094xPUB165
local.type.statusPublished Version
local.contributor.affiliationStrazdins, Lyndall, College of Medicine, Biology and Environment, ANU
local.contributor.affiliationD'Souza, Rennie, College of Medicine, Biology and Environment, ANU
local.contributor.affiliationClements, Mark, College of Medicine, Biology and Environment, ANU
local.contributor.affiliationBroom, Dorothy, College of Medicine, Biology and Environment, ANU
local.contributor.affiliationRodgers, Bryan, College of Arts and Social Sciences, ANU
local.contributor.affiliationBerry, Helen, College of Medicine, Biology and Environment, ANU
local.description.embargo2037-12-31
local.bibliographicCitation.issue6
local.bibliographicCitation.startpage529
local.bibliographicCitation.lastpage534
local.identifier.doi10.1136/jech.2009.093732
dc.date.updated2016-02-24T11:08:16Z
local.identifier.scopusID2-s2.0-79956215830
local.identifier.thomsonID000290209400011
CollectionsANU Research Publications

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