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A comparison of PV/electrolyser and photoelectrolytic technologies for use in solar to hydrogen energy storage systems

Conibeer, Gavin; Richards, Brendon

Description

The approach of using hydrogen for an energy store to offset seasonal variations in solar energy is one very much at the periphery of current renewable energy system design. Nonetheless, its inherent advantages for long term storage in stand alone power systems warrant further detailed investigation. This paper provides a comparative overview of the very disparate technologies within two generic approaches to achieving this goal. These are: photovoltaic (PV) powered electrolysis of water and...[Show more]

dc.contributor.authorConibeer, Gavin
dc.contributor.authorRichards, Brendon
dc.date.accessioned2015-12-08T22:43:35Z
dc.identifier.issn0360-3199
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/1885/37350
dc.description.abstractThe approach of using hydrogen for an energy store to offset seasonal variations in solar energy is one very much at the periphery of current renewable energy system design. Nonetheless, its inherent advantages for long term storage in stand alone power systems warrant further detailed investigation. This paper provides a comparative overview of the very disparate technologies within two generic approaches to achieving this goal. These are: photovoltaic (PV) powered electrolysis of water and direct photoelectrolytic (PE) generation of hydrogen from water. Comparison of these is difficult, however, the paper compares devices of similar material system and structure within each generic scheme. PV/electrolysis is the more mature technology but there is still a wide range of potential 'solar to hydrogen' efficiencies. A figure of about 9% is estimated for comparison, with justification given. The comparative figure for PE is more difficult to judge because of even more disparate approaches to specific problems of sufficient photovoltage and stability, but an approximate comparative figure of 5% is estimated. Thus making PV/electrolysis more appropriate at present. Nonetheless, inherent advantages of simplicity of system design and potential robustness mean that PE may become more appropriate as the technology develops.
dc.publisherPergamon-Elsevier Ltd
dc.sourceInternational Journal of Hydrogen Energy
dc.subjectKeywords: Electrolysis; Hydrogen; Photovoltaic cells; Solar energy; Energy storage systems; Photoelectrolysis; Energy storage Electrolysis; Hydrogen; Photoelectrochemical; Photoelectrolysis; Photovoltaic; SAPS; Solar
dc.titleA comparison of PV/electrolyser and photoelectrolytic technologies for use in solar to hydrogen energy storage systems
dc.typeJournal article
local.description.notesImported from ARIES
local.identifier.citationvolume32
dc.date.issued2007
local.identifier.absfor090608 - Renewable Power and Energy Systems Engineering (excl. Solar Cells)
local.identifier.ariespublicationU1408929xPUB148
local.type.statusPublished Version
local.contributor.affiliationConibeer, Gavin, University of New South Wales
local.contributor.affiliationRichards, Brendon, College of Engineering and Computer Science, ANU
local.description.embargo2037-12-31
local.bibliographicCitation.issue14
local.bibliographicCitation.startpage2703
local.bibliographicCitation.lastpage2711
local.identifier.doi10.1016/j.ijhydene.2006.09.012
dc.date.updated2015-12-08T10:42:25Z
local.identifier.scopusID2-s2.0-34548512290
CollectionsANU Research Publications

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