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Transfer Issues and Directions for Reform: Australian Transfer Policy in Comparative Perspective

Whiteford, Peter

Description

Tax-transfer systems in developed countries balance a range of competing objectives, including�poverty alleviation�and redistribution to the poor, and protection more broadly against a range of social risks, either through redistribution across the life-cycle or social insurance. In seeking to balance these objectives, governments are concerned to maximise policy effectiveness and to minimise adverse outcomes in relation to incentives to work or save or to form or dissolve families or...[Show more]

dc.contributor.authorWhiteford, Peter
dc.coverage.spatialMelbourne Australia
dc.date.accessioned2015-12-08T22:42:15Z
dc.date.createdJune 18-19 2009
dc.identifier.isbn9780734042170
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/1885/37008
dc.description.abstractTax-transfer systems in developed countries balance a range of competing objectives, including�poverty alleviation�and redistribution to the poor, and protection more broadly against a range of social risks, either through redistribution across the life-cycle or social insurance. In seeking to balance these objectives, governments are concerned to maximise policy effectiveness and to minimise adverse outcomes in relation to incentives to work or save or to form or dissolve families or households, while also guaranteeing the long-term sustainability of the system. This paper provides a background and a framework for considering key transfer policy issues in Australia. The paper places the Australian system of social transfers in an international comparative perspective, identifying the distinctive design features and outcomes of Australian arrangements, as well as the similarities between Australian arrangements and those in other countries. The paper also discusses the distributional profile of Australian transfers compared to those in other OECD countries, and assesses the efficiency and effectiveness of the Australian system in terms of�poverty reduction�and impacts on income inequality. The paper also discusses interpersonal and intrapersonal redistribution and updates previous�comparative analysis�of the extent of 'churning' and middle class welfare?(Whiteford, 2006).
dc.publisherUniversity of Melbourne
dc.relation.ispartofseriesMelbourne Institute - Australia's Future Tax and Transfer Policy Conference
dc.sourceMelbourne Institute – Australia’s Future Tax and Transfer Policy Conference: Proceedings of a Conference
dc.source.urihttp://www.taxreview.treasury.gov.au/content/Content.aspx?doc=html/conference.htm
dc.titleTransfer Issues and Directions for Reform: Australian Transfer Policy in Comparative Perspective
dc.typeConference paper
local.description.notesImported from ARIES
local.description.refereedYes
dc.date.issued2010
local.identifier.absfor140215 - Public Economics- Taxation and Revenue
local.identifier.ariespublicationu4657781xPUB143
local.type.statusPublished Version
local.contributor.affiliationWhiteford, Peter, College of Asia and the Pacific, ANU
local.description.embargo2037-12-31
local.bibliographicCitation.startpage20
local.bibliographicCitation.lastpage62
local.identifier.absseo910110 - Taxation
dc.date.updated2015-12-08T10:34:34Z
CollectionsANU Research Publications

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