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What can MEG neuroimaging tell us about reading?

Pammer, Kristen

Description

Learning to read is one of the most cognitively complex tasks we will ever learn to do. Thus understanding the reading process is not just intrinsically interesting, but can give us a number of valuable insights into the relationship between brain processes and cognitive behaviour. MEG neuroimaging allows us to investigate reading processes in terms of the spatial extent of cortical activations when reading, the timing between brain locations, and the frequency dynamics between different...[Show more]

dc.contributor.authorPammer, Kristen
dc.date.accessioned2015-12-08T22:39:11Z
dc.date.available2015-12-08T22:39:11Z
dc.identifier.issn0911-6044
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/1885/36138
dc.description.abstractLearning to read is one of the most cognitively complex tasks we will ever learn to do. Thus understanding the reading process is not just intrinsically interesting, but can give us a number of valuable insights into the relationship between brain processes and cognitive behaviour. MEG neuroimaging allows us to investigate reading processes in terms of the spatial extent of cortical activations when reading, the timing between brain locations, and the frequency dynamics between different cortical areas. The big challenge now for neuroscience is to model all three components of neural behaviour in order to be able to really understand the complexity of human cognition.
dc.publisherPergamon Press
dc.sourceJournal of Neurolinguistics
dc.subjectKeywords: article; brain region; cognition; comprehension; dyslexia; human; learning; magnetoencephalography; phonetics; priority journal; reading; semantics; stimulus response; visual stimulation; word recognition MEG; Neuroimaging; Reading
dc.titleWhat can MEG neuroimaging tell us about reading?
dc.typeJournal article
local.description.notesImported from ARIES
local.identifier.citationvolume22
dc.date.issued2009
local.identifier.absfor170101 - Biological Psychology (Neuropsychology, Psychopharmacology, Physiological Psychology)
local.identifier.ariespublicationu9312950xPUB132
local.type.statusPublished Version
local.contributor.affiliationPammer, Kristen, College of Medicine, Biology and Environment, ANU
local.bibliographicCitation.issue2009
local.bibliographicCitation.startpage266
local.bibliographicCitation.lastpage280
local.identifier.doi10.1016/j.jneuroling.2008.12.004
dc.date.updated2016-02-24T11:58:12Z
local.identifier.scopusID2-s2.0-60649100447
local.identifier.thomsonID000264807400005
CollectionsANU Research Publications

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