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Consequences of Workplace Bullying on Employee Identification and Satisfaction Among Australians and Singaporeans

Loh, Jennifer Min Ing; Restubog, Simon; Zagenczyk, Thomas J.

Description

This study responds to the call for cross-cultural investigations of workplace bullying by examining the relationship between workplace bullying and attitudes among employees from two countries. The authors argue that employees from societies that are less inclined to accept that power differences exist as a result of structure (low power distance countries, e.g., Australia) will respond to workplace bullying more negatively than will employees from cultures that accept that power differences...[Show more]

dc.contributor.authorLoh, Jennifer Min Ing
dc.contributor.authorRestubog, Simon
dc.contributor.authorZagenczyk, Thomas J.
dc.date.accessioned2015-12-08T22:37:48Z
dc.identifier.issn0022-0221
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/1885/35674
dc.description.abstractThis study responds to the call for cross-cultural investigations of workplace bullying by examining the relationship between workplace bullying and attitudes among employees from two countries. The authors argue that employees from societies that are less inclined to accept that power differences exist as a result of structure (low power distance countries, e.g., Australia) will respond to workplace bullying more negatively than will employees from cultures that accept that power differences exist as a result of structure (high power distance, e.g., Singapore). In all, 165 Singaporean and 152 Australian employees completed surveys designed to assess workplace bullying, workgroup identification, and job satisfaction. Results showed that workplace bullying was negatively related to both workgroup identification and job satisfaction among employees from both countries. Moreover, national culture influenced the relationship between bullying and job satisfaction and workgroup identification such that the negative relationships between bullying and these attitudinal outcomes were stronger for Australians than Singaporeans.
dc.publisherSage Publications Inc
dc.sourceJournal of Cross-Cultural Psychology
dc.subjectKeywords: Culture; Job satisfaction; Workgroup identification; Workplace bullying
dc.titleConsequences of Workplace Bullying on Employee Identification and Satisfaction Among Australians and Singaporeans
dc.typeJournal article
local.description.notesImported from ARIES
local.identifier.citationvolume4
dc.date.issued2010
local.identifier.absfor150311 - Organisational Behaviour
local.identifier.ariespublicationu4024396xPUB127
local.type.statusPublished Version
local.contributor.affiliationLoh, Jennifer Min Ing, University of New England
local.contributor.affiliationRestubog, Simon, College of Business and Economics, ANU
local.contributor.affiliationZagenczyk, Thomas J., Clemson University
local.description.embargo2037-12-31
local.bibliographicCitation.issue2
local.bibliographicCitation.startpage236
local.bibliographicCitation.lastpage252
local.identifier.doi10.1177/0022022109354641
local.identifier.absseo910402 - Management
dc.date.updated2016-02-24T10:28:03Z
local.identifier.scopusID2-s2.0-76249122641
local.identifier.thomsonID000274275500007
CollectionsANU Research Publications

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