Skip navigation
Skip navigation

Cheating on climate change? Australia's challenge to global warning norms

Stevenson, Hayley

Description

The international governance of climate change was initially informed by two norms concerning who should take responsibility for mitigating climate change and how such mitigation should be pursued.1 Since the early 1990s, these norms have been contested by several states. In this article the author argues that such contestation is a product of the perceived incongruence between these norms and the domestic conditions of those states they seek to govern. Following an overview of the emergence...[Show more]

dc.contributor.authorStevenson, Hayley
dc.date.accessioned2015-12-08T22:37:25Z
dc.identifier.issn1035-7718
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/1885/35516
dc.description.abstractThe international governance of climate change was initially informed by two norms concerning who should take responsibility for mitigating climate change and how such mitigation should be pursued.1 Since the early 1990s, these norms have been contested by several states. In this article the author argues that such contestation is a product of the perceived incongruence between these norms and the domestic conditions of those states they seek to govern. Following an overview of the emergence and contestation of climate governance norms, the author elaborates on this relationship between international norms and domestic conditions. These theoretical assumptions are then explored in the context of Australia's response to international climate governance norms from the late 1980s to 2007. As the author demonstrates, the perceived incongruence of these norms with domestic conditions led Australia's foreign policy makers to contest the norms and focus on the construction of alternative governance processes by reframing the issue of climate change. Through a diversion of attention away from historical emissions to future emissions and possible technological mitigation options, climate governance was temporarily reconciled with Australia's domestic conditions. However, the author suggests that this came at the expense of international equity and long-term national sustainability.
dc.publisherCarfax Publishing, Taylor & Francis Group
dc.sourceAustralian Journal of International Affairs
dc.subjectKeywords: emission control; environmental policy; foreign policy; global warming; governance approach; mitigation; perception; policy making; sustainability; Australasia; Australia
dc.titleCheating on climate change? Australia's challenge to global warning norms
dc.typeJournal article
local.description.notesImported from ARIES
local.identifier.citationvolume63
dc.date.issued2009
local.identifier.absfor160607 - International Relations
local.identifier.absfor160605 - Environmental Politics
local.identifier.absfor160601 - Australian Government and Politics
local.identifier.ariespublicationu4317071xPUB125
local.type.statusPublished Version
local.contributor.affiliationStevenson, Hayley, College of Arts and Social Sciences, ANU
local.description.embargo2037-12-31
local.bibliographicCitation.issue2
local.bibliographicCitation.startpage165
local.bibliographicCitation.lastpage186
local.identifier.doi10.1080/10357710902895111
dc.date.updated2016-02-24T10:54:15Z
local.identifier.scopusID2-s2.0-70449403664
CollectionsANU Research Publications

Download

File Description SizeFormat Image
01_Stevenson_Cheating_on_climate_change?__2009.pdf179.83 kBAdobe PDF    Request a copy


Items in Open Research are protected by copyright, with all rights reserved, unless otherwise indicated.

Updated:  19 May 2020/ Responsible Officer:  University Librarian/ Page Contact:  Library Systems & Web Coordinator