Skip navigation
Skip navigation

Equality and difference: Persisting historical themes in health and alcohol policies affecting Indigenous Australians

Brady, Margaret

Description

Disseminating national health and alcohol policies to Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander people in Australia has been a challenging task for governments and public servants. This has been for a number of reasons, including the enduring (negative) legacy of past "Aboriginal affairs" policies, the fact that Indigenous health programmes and alcohol programmes have been treated separately since the 1970s, and a more recent context in which the recognition of cultural difference was privileged....[Show more]

dc.contributor.authorBrady, Margaret
dc.date.accessioned2015-12-08T22:36:29Z
dc.identifier.issn0143-005X
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/1885/35271
dc.description.abstractDisseminating national health and alcohol policies to Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander people in Australia has been a challenging task for governments and public servants. This has been for a number of reasons, including the enduring (negative) legacy of past "Aboriginal affairs" policies, the fact that Indigenous health programmes and alcohol programmes have been treated separately since the 1970s, and a more recent context in which the recognition of cultural difference was privileged. Confronted with the politics of difference, health departments were slow to examine avenues through which best practice advice emanating from WHO, and alcohol policies such as harm minimisation and early identification and treatment in primary health care, could be communicated in culturally recognisable ways to independent Indigenous services. In addition, there was hostility towards harm minimisation policies from Indigenous service providers, and Indigenous treatment programmes remained largely committed to abstinence-oriented modalities and the disease model of alcoholism, despite moves away from these approaches in the mainstream. However, genuinely innovative acute interventions and environmental controls over alcohol have been developed by Indigenous community-based organisations, approaches that are reinforced by international policy research evidence.
dc.publisherBritish Medical Association
dc.sourceJournal of Epidemiology and Community Health
dc.subjectKeywords: alcohol; alcohol; community organization; disease treatment; health education; health policy; primary health care; public health; social policy; World Health Organization; Aborigine; alcohol consumption; alcoholism; Australia; cultural factor; ethnic diff
dc.titleEquality and difference: Persisting historical themes in health and alcohol policies affecting Indigenous Australians
dc.typeJournal article
local.description.notesImported from ARIES
local.identifier.citationvolume61
dc.date.issued2007
local.identifier.absfor169902 - Studies of Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander Society
local.identifier.absfor111715 - Pacific Peoples Health
local.identifier.ariespublicationu8100238xPUB122
local.type.statusPublished Version
local.contributor.affiliationBrady, Margaret , College of Arts and Social Sciences, ANU
local.description.embargo2037-12-31
local.bibliographicCitation.issue9
local.bibliographicCitation.startpage759
local.bibliographicCitation.lastpage763
local.identifier.doi10.1136/jech.2006.057455
local.identifier.absseo920303 - Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander Health - Health System Performance (incl. Effectiveness of Interventions)
local.identifier.absseo940102 - Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander Development and Welfare
dc.date.updated2015-12-08T09:50:36Z
local.identifier.scopusID2-s2.0-34548169797
CollectionsANU Research Publications

Download

File Description SizeFormat Image
01_Brady_Equality_and_difference:_2007.pdf166.39 kBAdobe PDFThumbnail


Items in Open Research are protected by copyright, with all rights reserved, unless otherwise indicated.

Updated:  19 May 2020/ Responsible Officer:  University Librarian/ Page Contact:  Library Systems & Web Coordinator