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Gastroenteritis and Food-Borne Disease in Elderly People Living in Long-Term Care

Veitch, Mark; Hall, Gillian; Kirk, Martyn

Description

Elderly people in long-term care facilities (LTCFs) may be more vulnerable to infectious gastroenteritis and food-borne disease and more likely to experience serious outcomes. We review the epidemiology of gastroenteritis and food-borne diseases in elderly residents of LTCFs to inform measures aimed at preventing sporadic disease and outbreaks. Gastroenteritis in elderly people is primarily acquired from other infected persons and contaminated foods, although infections may also be acquired...[Show more]

dc.contributor.authorVeitch, Mark
dc.contributor.authorHall, Gillian
dc.contributor.authorKirk, Martyn
dc.date.accessioned2015-12-08T22:36:26Z
dc.identifier.issn1058-4838
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/1885/35257
dc.description.abstractElderly people in long-term care facilities (LTCFs) may be more vulnerable to infectious gastroenteritis and food-borne disease and more likely to experience serious outcomes. We review the epidemiology of gastroenteritis and food-borne diseases in elderly residents of LTCFs to inform measures aimed at preventing sporadic disease and outbreaks. Gastroenteritis in elderly people is primarily acquired from other infected persons and contaminated foods, although infections may also be acquired when residents have poor personal hygiene, have contaminated living environments or water, or have contact with infected pets. Early recognition of outbreaks and implementation of control measures is critical to reduce the effects on LTCF residents and staff members. Although outbreaks among LTCF residents are common, they are challenging to investigate, and there are still major gaps in our knowledge, particularly in regards to controlling noroviruses, the incidence and causes of specific infections, and sources of food-borne disease.
dc.publisherUniversity of Chicago Press
dc.sourceClinical Infectious Diseases
dc.subjectKeywords: antibiotic agent; clinical feature; epidemic; food contamination; food poisoning; gastroenteritis; health care facility; health care personnel; health survey; human; infection risk; long term care; medical information; morbidity; personal hygiene; priorit
dc.titleGastroenteritis and Food-Borne Disease in Elderly People Living in Long-Term Care
dc.typeJournal article
local.description.notesImported from ARIES
local.identifier.citationvolume50
dc.date.issued2010
local.identifier.absfor111706 - Epidemiology
local.identifier.ariespublicationu4637548xPUB122
local.type.statusPublished Version
local.contributor.affiliationKirk, Martyn, College of Medicine, Biology and Environment, ANU
local.contributor.affiliationVeitch, Mark, University of Melbourne
local.contributor.affiliationHall, Gillian, College of Medicine, Biology and Environment, ANU
local.description.embargo2037-12-31
local.bibliographicCitation.startpage397
local.bibliographicCitation.lastpage404
local.identifier.doi10.1086/649878
dc.date.updated2016-02-24T11:16:04Z
local.identifier.scopusID2-s2.0-75749111632
local.identifier.thomsonID000273500300016
CollectionsANU Research Publications

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