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Screening for dementia: a review of self assessment instruments

Cherbuin, Nicolas; Lipnicki, Darren; Anstey, Kaarin

Description

Background: The objective of this study was to review available dementia screening instruments that could be recommended for self-administration, particularly in electronic format. Owing to the gradual loss of insight associated with the progression of dementia, a broad definition of self-administration including self-administration by concerned informants (family, friends, carers) was used. Method: A systematic search of PubMed, PsychINFO, and the Cochrane Library Database was conducted. Only...[Show more]

dc.contributor.authorCherbuin, Nicolas
dc.contributor.authorLipnicki, Darren
dc.contributor.authorAnstey, Kaarin
dc.date.accessioned2015-12-08T22:36:23Z
dc.date.available2015-12-08T22:36:23Z
dc.identifier.issn1041-6102
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/1885/35230
dc.description.abstractBackground: The objective of this study was to review available dementia screening instruments that could be recommended for self-administration, particularly in electronic format. Owing to the gradual loss of insight associated with the progression of dementia, a broad definition of self-administration including self-administration by concerned informants (family, friends, carers) was used. Method: A systematic search of PubMed, PsychINFO, and the Cochrane Library Database was conducted. Only available full-text articles about dementia screening instruments written in English were included. Articles reporting on instruments used in a non-English context were excluded unless a validated English version of the instrument was available. Included instruments were assessed against the precise criteria and characteristics of the Mini-mental State Examination (MMSE), the most widely used screening instrument. Results: The Concord Informant Dementia Scale (CIDS) and the Informant Questionnaire on Cognitive Decline in the Elderly (IQCODE) were the only instruments meeting all selection criteria. The Memory Impairment Screen (MIS) also met the criteria, although it lacks validation for self-administration. No instrument has been validated for self-administration in electronic format. Conclusions: It is recommended that the MIS, the CIDS and the IQCODE be validated for self-administration in electronic format.
dc.publisherSpringer
dc.sourceInternational Psychogeriatrics
dc.subjectKeywords: cognitive defect; data extraction; dementia; diagnostic and statistical manual of mental disorders; human; mini mental state examination; questionnaire; rating scale; review; screening; self evaluation; self report; Cognition Disorders; Dementia; Humans; Dementia; Informant; Mild cognitive impairment; Screening; Self assessment
dc.titleScreening for dementia: a review of self assessment instruments
dc.typeJournal article
local.description.notesImported from ARIES
local.identifier.citationvolume20
dc.date.issued2008
local.identifier.absfor110300 - CLINICAL SCIENCES
local.identifier.absfor111700 - PUBLIC HEALTH AND HEALTH SERVICES
local.identifier.ariespublicationU4146231xPUB122
local.type.statusPublished Version
local.contributor.affiliationCherbuin, Nicolas, College of Medicine, Biology and Environment, ANU
local.contributor.affiliationAnstey, Kaarin, College of Medicine, Biology and Environment, ANU
local.contributor.affiliationLipnicki, Darren, College of Medicine, Biology and Environment, ANU
local.bibliographicCitation.issue3
local.bibliographicCitation.startpage431
local.bibliographicCitation.lastpage548
local.identifier.doi10.1017/S104161020800673X
dc.date.updated2015-12-08T09:49:53Z
local.identifier.scopusID2-s2.0-41549103889
local.identifier.thomsonID000259519000002
CollectionsANU Research Publications

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