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Population size and molecular evolution on islands

Woolfit, Megan; Bromham, Lindell

Description

The nearly neutral theory predicts that the rate and pattern of molecular evolution will be influenced by effective population size (Ne), because in small populations more slightly deleterious mutations are expected to drift to fixation. This important prediction has not been widely empirically tested, largely because of the difficulty of comparing rates of molecular evolution in sufficient numbers of independent lineages which differ only in Ne. Island endemic species provide an ideal test of...[Show more]

dc.contributor.authorWoolfit, Megan
dc.contributor.authorBromham, Lindell
dc.date.accessioned2015-12-08T22:36:07Z
dc.identifier.issn0962-8452
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/1885/35120
dc.description.abstractThe nearly neutral theory predicts that the rate and pattern of molecular evolution will be influenced by effective population size (Ne), because in small populations more slightly deleterious mutations are expected to drift to fixation. This important prediction has not been widely empirically tested, largely because of the difficulty of comparing rates of molecular evolution in sufficient numbers of independent lineages which differ only in Ne. Island endemic species provide an ideal test of the effect of Ne on molecular evolution because species restricted to islands frequently have smaller Ne than closely related mainland species, and island endemics have arisen from mainland lineages many times in a wide range of taxa. We collated a dataset of 70 phylogenetically independent comparisons between island and mainland taxa, including vertebrates, invertebrates and plants, from 19 different island groups. The rate of molecular evolution in these lineages was estimated by maximum likelihood using two measures: overall substitution rate and the ratio of non-synonymous to synonymous substitution rates. We show that island lineages have significantly higher ratios of non-synonymous to synonymous substitution rates than mainland lineages, as predicted by the nearly neutral theory, although overall substitution rates do not differ significantly.
dc.publisherRoyal Society of London
dc.sourceProceedings of the Royal Society of London Series B: Biological Sciences
dc.subjectKeywords: isolated population; molecular analysis; phylogenetics; population size; article; human; intermethod comparison; invertebrate; island biogeography; molecular clock; molecular evolution; neutral gene theory; nonhuman; phylogeny; population size; priority j Comparative method; dN/dS; Effective population size; Molecular clock; Molecular evolution; Substitution rates
dc.titlePopulation size and molecular evolution on islands
dc.typeJournal article
local.description.notesImported from ARIES
local.identifier.citationvolume272
dc.date.issued2005
local.identifier.absfor060311 - Speciation and Extinction
local.identifier.ariespublicationu9511635xPUB120
local.type.statusPublished Version
local.contributor.affiliationWoolfit, Megan, University of Sussex
local.contributor.affiliationBromham, Lindell, College of Medicine, Biology and Environment, ANU
local.description.embargo2037-12-31
local.bibliographicCitation.startpage2277
local.bibliographicCitation.lastpage2282
local.identifier.doi10.1098/rspb.2005.3217
dc.date.updated2015-12-08T09:47:38Z
local.identifier.scopusID2-s2.0-27244456236
CollectionsANU Research Publications

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