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Atlantic-Pacific seesaw and its role in outgassing CO2 during Heinrich events

Menviel, L; England, Matthew Heathcote; Meissner, K.J.; Mouchet, A.T.; Yu, Jimin

Description

Paleoproxy records indicate that a marked weakening of the Atlantic Meridional Overturning Circulation (AMOC) during Heinrich events was often accompanied by a notable atmospheric CO2 increase. However, previous modeling studies display conflicting atmospheric CO2 responses to an AMOC shutdown. Here we use model simulations combined with paleoproxy records to show that depending on the deep and bottom water transport in the Northern and Southern Pacific Ocean during an AMOC weakening, the ocean...[Show more]

dc.contributor.authorMenviel, L
dc.contributor.authorEngland, Matthew Heathcote
dc.contributor.authorMeissner, K.J.
dc.contributor.authorMouchet, A.T.
dc.contributor.authorYu, Jimin
dc.date.accessioned2015-12-08T22:35:46Z
dc.identifier.issn0883-8305
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/1885/34999
dc.description.abstractPaleoproxy records indicate that a marked weakening of the Atlantic Meridional Overturning Circulation (AMOC) during Heinrich events was often accompanied by a notable atmospheric CO2 increase. However, previous modeling studies display conflicting atmospheric CO2 responses to an AMOC shutdown. Here we use model simulations combined with paleoproxy records to show that depending on the deep and bottom water transport in the Northern and Southern Pacific Ocean during an AMOC weakening, the ocean can act either as a sink or a source of carbon. Results from idealized meltwater experiments as well as from a transient experiment covering Heinrich stadial 4 suggest that a shutdown of the AMOC during Heinrich stadials 4 (HS4) and 1 (HS1) led to an enhancement of Antarctic Bottom Water (AABW) and North Pacific Deep Water (NPDW) transport. We show that enhanced deep and bottom water transport in the Pacific Ocean ventilates deep Pacific carbon through the Southern Ocean, thus contributing to a rise in atmospheric CO2. This mechanism yields a good agreement between paleoproxy records and modeling results, thus highlighting the possible establishment of an Atlantic-Pacific seesaw during Heinrich stadials. Enhanced AABW and NPDW transport could account for most of the observed atmospheric CO2 increase during HS4 and for about 30% of the atmospheric CO2 increase during HS1.
dc.publisherAmerican Geophysical Union
dc.sourcePaleoceanography
dc.titleAtlantic-Pacific seesaw and its role in outgassing CO2 during Heinrich events
dc.typeJournal article
local.description.notesImported from ARIES
local.identifier.citationvolume29
dc.date.issued2013
local.identifier.absfor040303 - Geochronology
local.identifier.ariespublicationu4539375xPUB119
local.type.statusPublished Version
local.contributor.affiliationMenviel, L, University of New South Wales
local.contributor.affiliationEngland, Matthew Heathcote, University of New South Wales
local.contributor.affiliationMeissner, K.J., University of New South Wales
local.contributor.affiliationMouchet, A.T., Laboratoire des Sciences du Climat et de l’Environnement
local.contributor.affiliationYu, Jimin, College of Physical and Mathematical Sciences, ANU
local.description.embargo2037-12-31
local.bibliographicCitation.startpage58
local.bibliographicCitation.lastpage70
local.identifier.doi10.1002/2013PA002542
local.identifier.absseo970104 - Expanding Knowledge in the Earth Sciences
dc.date.updated2015-12-08T09:44:56Z
local.identifier.scopusID2-s2.0-84893178880
local.identifier.thomsonID000337977700005
CollectionsANU Research Publications

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