Skip navigation
Skip navigation

Analysis of lap times in international swimming competitions

Robertson, Eileen; Pyne, David; Hopkins, Will G; Anson, Judith

Description

Swimming performances were analysed for the top 16 finishers (semi-finalists, finalists) in nine international competitions over a 7-year period (1530 males, 1527 female). Total race time and intermediate lap times were log-transformed and analysed for effects of sex (male, female), stroke (freestyle, form strokes, individual medley), event (100, 200, and 400 m), and place (1-16). Between-athlete correlations characterized the relationship of each lap to final time, and within-athlete estimates...[Show more]

dc.contributor.authorRobertson, Eileen
dc.contributor.authorPyne, David
dc.contributor.authorHopkins, Will G
dc.contributor.authorAnson, Judith
dc.date.accessioned2015-12-08T22:35:43Z
dc.identifier.issn0264-0414
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/1885/34977
dc.description.abstractSwimming performances were analysed for the top 16 finishers (semi-finalists, finalists) in nine international competitions over a 7-year period (1530 males, 1527 female). Total race time and intermediate lap times were log-transformed and analysed for effects of sex (male, female), stroke (freestyle, form strokes, individual medley), event (100, 200, and 400 m), and place (1-16). Between-athlete correlations characterized the relationship of each lap to final time, and within-athlete estimates quantified the effect of lap time on improvements in final time. Finalists exhibited very large correlations (r = 0.7-0.9) with final time in the second 50-m lap of 100-m events and the middle two 50-m and 100-m laps of 200-m and 400-m events respectively. For an individual swimmer, an achievable change in lap time was associated with an approximate 0.4-0.8% improvement in final time for finalists and an approximate 0.5-1.1% improvement in final time for semi-finalists, depending on sex, stroke, and event. The pattern of lap times was similar for the top 16 swimmers and between the best and worst swims for finalists. These findings indicate that substantial improvements can be made via the final lap in sprints and the middle two laps of 200- to 400-m events, but the overall pattern of lap times should not be changed.
dc.publisherTaylor & Francis Group
dc.sourceJournal of Sports Sciences
dc.subjectKeywords: Athletic Performance; Competitive Behavior; Female; Humans; Male; Swimming; Time Factors Correlation; Mixed modelling; Pattern of pacing; Performance
dc.titleAnalysis of lap times in international swimming competitions
dc.typeJournal article
local.description.notesImported from ARIES
local.identifier.citationvolume27
dc.date.issued2009
local.identifier.absfor110699 - Human Movement and Sports Science not elsewhere classified
local.identifier.ariespublicationu4201517xPUB119
local.type.statusPublished Version
local.contributor.affiliationRobertson, Eileen, Australian Institute of Sport
local.contributor.affiliationPyne, David, College of Medicine, Biology and Environment, ANU
local.contributor.affiliationHopkins, Will G, Auckland University of Technology
local.contributor.affiliationAnson, Judith, University of Canberra
local.description.embargo2037-12-31
local.bibliographicCitation.issue4
local.bibliographicCitation.startpage387
local.bibliographicCitation.lastpage395
local.identifier.doi10.1080/02640410802641400
dc.date.updated2016-02-24T10:40:32Z
local.identifier.scopusID2-s2.0-61349145784
CollectionsANU Research Publications

Download

File Description SizeFormat Image
01_Robertson_Analysis_of_lap_times_in_2009.pdf315.92 kBAdobe PDFThumbnail
02_Robertson_Analysis_of_lap_times_in_2009.pdf270.76 kBAdobe PDFThumbnail


Items in Open Research are protected by copyright, with all rights reserved, unless otherwise indicated.

Updated:  19 May 2020/ Responsible Officer:  University Librarian/ Page Contact:  Library Systems & Web Coordinator