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Geochronology and the evolution of Australia in the Mesozoic

McDougall, Ian

Description

The Mesozoic geological history of the Australian continent saw the dispersal of Gondwana, of which Australia was part, and a change from progressive accretion of crust to the eastern one-third of the continent to a passive margin as the subduction zone moved much further to the east. The development of new seafloor adjacent to the west, south and east coasts of the continent records the breakup history and the formation of the Australian tectonic plate which has moved in an essentially...[Show more]

dc.contributor.authorMcDougall, Ian
dc.date.accessioned2015-12-08T22:34:00Z
dc.identifier.issn0812-0099
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/1885/34886
dc.description.abstractThe Mesozoic geological history of the Australian continent saw the dispersal of Gondwana, of which Australia was part, and a change from progressive accretion of crust to the eastern one-third of the continent to a passive margin as the subduction zone moved much further to the east. The development of new seafloor adjacent to the west, south and east coasts of the continent records the breakup history and the formation of the Australian tectonic plate which has moved in an essentially northerly azimuth away from Antarctica over much of the last 100 million years. Geochronology directly or indirectly through various time-scales, in concert with many other disciplines, has played a significant role in our present understanding of the Mesozoic geological history of Australia. The role of these time-scales in the interpretation of the geological evolution of Australia during the Mesozoic is highlighted, the final stages of development of the Tasman Fold Belt are briefly discussed, and the widespread tholeiitic magmatism in Tasmania during the Middle Jurassic is examined again in the broader context of similar magmatism across Antarctica and into southern Africa.
dc.publisherBlackwell Publishing Ltd
dc.sourceAustralian Journal of Earth Sciences
dc.subjectKeywords: accretion; continental breakup; geochronology; geological record; Gondwana; magmatism; Mesozoic; passive margin; seafloor spreading; subduction zone; tectonic evolution; Australasia; Australia Australia; Geochronology; Gondwana; Magmatism; Mesozoic; Seafloor spreading; Tasman Fold Belt
dc.titleGeochronology and the evolution of Australia in the Mesozoic
dc.typeJournal article
local.description.notesImported from ARIES
local.identifier.citationvolume55
dc.date.issued2008
local.identifier.absfor040305 - Marine Geoscience
local.identifier.absfor040313 - Tectonics
local.identifier.absfor040303 - Geochronology
local.identifier.ariespublicationu4047674xPUB118
local.type.statusPublished Version
local.contributor.affiliationMcDougall, Ian, College of Physical and Mathematical Sciences, ANU
local.description.embargo2037-12-31
local.bibliographicCitation.issue6&7
local.bibliographicCitation.startpage849
local.bibliographicCitation.lastpage864
local.identifier.doi10.1080/08120090802163559
dc.date.updated2015-12-08T09:39:48Z
local.identifier.scopusID2-s2.0-50449101302
local.identifier.thomsonID000258501000012
CollectionsANU Research Publications

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