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Understanding the role of inflammatory cytokines in malaria and related diseases

Clark, Ian A; Alleva, Lisa; Budd, Alison; Cowden, William

Description

It is now broadly accepted for infectious disease in general that it is not the invading organism, but the body's unbridled response to it-the "cytokine storm"-that causes illness and pathology. Nevertheless, many researchers still regard the harmful effects of falciparum malaria as being governed by oligaemic hypoxia arising from parasitised erythrocytes obstructing blood flow through vulnerable organs, particularly the brain, and we summarise why these notions are no longer tenable. In our...[Show more]

dc.contributor.authorClark, Ian A
dc.contributor.authorAlleva, Lisa
dc.contributor.authorBudd, Alison
dc.contributor.authorCowden, William
dc.date.accessioned2015-12-08T22:33:19Z
dc.identifier.issn1477-8939
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/1885/34625
dc.description.abstractIt is now broadly accepted for infectious disease in general that it is not the invading organism, but the body's unbridled response to it-the "cytokine storm"-that causes illness and pathology. Nevertheless, many researchers still regard the harmful effects of falciparum malaria as being governed by oligaemic hypoxia arising from parasitised erythrocytes obstructing blood flow through vulnerable organs, particularly the brain, and we summarise why these notions are no longer tenable. In our view, this harmful sequestration is readily accommodated within the cytokine storm perspective as one of its secondary effects. We approach these issues by examining aspects of malaria, sepsis and influenza in parallel, and discuss the insights that comparisons of the literature can provide on the validity of possible anti-disease therapies.
dc.publisherElsevier
dc.sourceTravel Medicine and Infectious Disease
dc.subjectKeywords: arginine; BCG vaccine; carbon monoxide; cytokine; dichloroacetic acid; Fas ligand; gemfibrozil; hemin; interleukin 1; interleukin 10; interleukin 4; interleukin 6; lymphotoxin; nitric oxide; OKT 3; recombinant tumor necrosis factor; transforming growth fa Cytokine storm; Influenza; Malaria; Sepsis; TNF
dc.titleUnderstanding the role of inflammatory cytokines in malaria and related diseases
dc.typeJournal article
local.description.notesImported from ARIES
local.identifier.citationvolume6
dc.date.issued2008
local.identifier.absfor110802 - Medical Infection Agents (incl. Prions)
local.identifier.absfor110799 - Immunology not elsewhere classified
local.identifier.absfor110803 - Medical Parasitology
local.identifier.ariespublicationu4325460xPUB115
local.type.statusPublished Version
local.contributor.affiliationClark, Ian A, College of Medicine, Biology and Environment, ANU
local.contributor.affiliationAlleva, Lisa, College of Medicine, Biology and Environment, ANU
local.contributor.affiliationBudd, Alison, College of Medicine, Biology and Environment, ANU
local.contributor.affiliationCowden, William, College of Medicine, Biology and Environment, ANU
local.description.embargo2037-12-31
local.bibliographicCitation.startpage67
local.bibliographicCitation.lastpage81
local.identifier.doi10.1016/j.tmaid.2007.07.002
dc.date.updated2015-12-08T09:34:37Z
local.identifier.scopusID2-s2.0-40649097787
CollectionsANU Research Publications

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