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Volunteering and psychological Wellbeing among young-old adults: How much is too much?

Windsor, Timothy; Rodgers, Bryan; Anstey, Kaarin

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Purpose: Research concerned with the relationship between volunteer activity and psychological well-being has typically reported higher levels of well-being among older adult volunteers relative to non-volunteers. However, few studies have examined nonlinear associations between frequency of volunteer activity and well-being. We examined nonlinear associations between hours spent volunteering and psychological well-being, controlling for employment status, partner status, physical health, and...[Show more]

dc.contributor.authorWindsor, Timothy
dc.contributor.authorRodgers, Bryan
dc.contributor.authorAnstey, Kaarin
dc.date.accessioned2015-12-08T22:33:17Z
dc.identifier.issn0016-9013
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/1885/34615
dc.description.abstractPurpose: Research concerned with the relationship between volunteer activity and psychological well-being has typically reported higher levels of well-being among older adult volunteers relative to non-volunteers. However, few studies have examined nonlinear associations between frequency of volunteer activity and well-being. We examined nonlinear associations between hours spent volunteering and psychological well-being, controlling for employment status, partner status, physical health, and education. We also investigated associations between different domains of volunteer activity and well-being, along with the possible moderating effects of gender on these relationships. Design and Methods: We used data from the PATH Through Life Project, a population-based study of Australian adults. Participants consisted of 2,136 older adults aged 64 to 68. Results: Nonlinear associations between hours spent volunteering and psychological well-being were evident, with these associations characterized by inverted U shapes, with nonvolunteers and those volunteering at high levels producing lower well-being scores relative to those volunteering at moderate levels. Few associations between specific domains of volunteer activity and well-being were evident, and no notable gender interactions emerged. Implications: The results point toward optimal frequency of engagement in volunteer activity for psychological well-being as being bounded by upper and lower levels, outside of which benefits to well-being diminish.
dc.publisherGerontological Society of America
dc.sourceGerontologist, The
dc.source.urihttp://gerontologist.gerontologyjournals.org/cgi/reprint/48/1/59
dc.subjectKeywords: adult; article; employment; gender; health status; human; normal human; population research; psychological well being; volunteer; work capacity; workload; Aged; Australia; Female; Humans; Male; Middle Aged; Personal Satisfaction; Sex Factors; Voluntary Wo Life satisfaction; Negative affect; Positive affect; Socioemotional selectivity theory; Voluntary workers
dc.titleVolunteering and psychological Wellbeing among young-old adults: How much is too much?
dc.typeJournal article
local.description.notesImported from ARIES
local.identifier.citationvolume48
dc.date.issued2008
local.identifier.absfor170100 - PSYCHOLOGY
local.identifier.ariespublicationU4146231xPUB115
local.type.statusPublished Version
local.contributor.affiliationWindsor, Timothy, College of Medicine, Biology and Environment, ANU
local.contributor.affiliationAnstey, Kaarin, College of Medicine, Biology and Environment, ANU
local.contributor.affiliationRodgers, Bryan, College of Arts and Social Sciences, ANU
local.description.embargo2037-12-31
local.bibliographicCitation.issue1
local.bibliographicCitation.startpage59
local.bibliographicCitation.lastpage70
dc.date.updated2015-12-08T09:34:30Z
local.identifier.scopusID2-s2.0-41849096344
local.identifier.thomsonID000256287200007
CollectionsANU Research Publications

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