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Refocusing the Focus group: AIRing as a basis for Effective Workplace

Eggins, Rachael; O'Brien, Anne; Reynolds, Katherine J; Haslam, S. Alexander; Crocker, Andrew

Description

Organizations commonly make use of focus groups for planning purposes while giving little thought to the dimensions on which those groups are formed. This paper argues that the dimensions of group formation have a significant effect on the ultimate success of any planning exercise. This is because in all organizations people necessarily self-categorize as members of groups that shape the way they think and act at work. However, there is often a lack of fit between the way organizations...[Show more]

dc.contributor.authorEggins, Rachael
dc.contributor.authorO'Brien, Anne
dc.contributor.authorReynolds, Katherine J
dc.contributor.authorHaslam, S. Alexander
dc.contributor.authorCrocker, Andrew
dc.date.accessioned2015-12-08T22:23:33Z
dc.identifier.issn1045-3172
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/1885/32916
dc.description.abstractOrganizations commonly make use of focus groups for planning purposes while giving little thought to the dimensions on which those groups are formed. This paper argues that the dimensions of group formation have a significant effect on the ultimate success of any planning exercise. This is because in all organizations people necessarily self-categorize as members of groups that shape the way they think and act at work. However, there is often a lack of fit between the way organizations categorize employees and the way those employees categorize themselves. To the extent that there is a lack of fit between imposed and self-identified categories, we argue that organizations will fail to effectively harness group resources. Any planning strategy that makes use of groups should organize people in terms of identities that are most relevant to their work in order (a) to have an impact on the way people think and act and (b) to ensure that people have (and feel that they have) the opportunity to provide input that is relevant, useful and important for the organization. The paper discusses a technique, AIRing, that allows organizations to address this issue effectively. This is the first stage of the ASPIRe negotiation-based planning model (Eggins et al., Social Identity at Work: Developing Theory for Organizational Practice, pp. 241-260, Philadelphia, PA: Taylor & Francis, 2003; Haslam et al., British Journal of Management, 14 (2003), pp. 357-369).
dc.publisherBlackwell Publishing Ltd
dc.sourceBritish Journal of Management
dc.titleRefocusing the Focus group: AIRing as a basis for Effective Workplace
dc.typeJournal article
local.description.notesImported from ARIES
local.identifier.citationvolume19
dc.date.issued2008
local.identifier.absfor170113 - Social and Community Psychology
local.identifier.ariespublicationU9312950xPUB96
local.type.statusPublished Version
local.contributor.affiliationEggins, Rachael, College of Medicine, Biology and Environment, ANU
local.contributor.affiliationO'Brien, Anne, University of Exeter
local.contributor.affiliationReynolds, Katherine J, College of Medicine, Biology and Environment, ANU
local.contributor.affiliationHaslam, S. Alexander, University of Exeter
local.contributor.affiliationCrocker, Andrew, College of Medicine, Biology and Environment, ANU
local.description.embargo2037-12-31
local.bibliographicCitation.issue3
local.bibliographicCitation.startpage277
local.bibliographicCitation.lastpage293
local.identifier.doi10.1111/j.1467-8551.2007.00541.x
dc.date.updated2015-12-08T08:53:21Z
local.identifier.scopusID2-s2.0-49249097379
local.identifier.thomsonID000258201700005
CollectionsANU Research Publications

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