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Competition and geography underlie speciation and morphological evolution in Indo-Australasian monitor lizards

Pavón-Vázquez, Carlos J.; Brennan, Ian; Skeels, Alexander; Keogh, J. Scott

Description

How biotic and abiotic factors act together to shape biological diversity is a major question in evolutionary biology. The recent availability of large datasets and development of new methodological approaches provide new tools to evaluate the predicted effects of ecological interactions and geography on lineage diversification and phenotypic evolution. Here, we use a near complete phylogenomic-scale phylogeny and a comprehensive morphological dataset comprising more than a thousand specimens...[Show more]

dc.contributor.authorPavón-Vázquez, Carlos J.
dc.contributor.authorBrennan, Ian
dc.contributor.authorSkeels, Alexander
dc.contributor.authorKeogh, J. Scott
dc.date.accessioned2024-04-03T01:16:23Z
dc.identifier.issn0014-3820
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/1885/316481
dc.description.abstractHow biotic and abiotic factors act together to shape biological diversity is a major question in evolutionary biology. The recent availability of large datasets and development of new methodological approaches provide new tools to evaluate the predicted effects of ecological interactions and geography on lineage diversification and phenotypic evolution. Here, we use a near complete phylogenomic-scale phylogeny and a comprehensive morphological dataset comprising more than a thousand specimens to assess the role of biotic and abiotic processes in the diversification of monitor lizards (Varanidae). This charismatic group of lizards shows striking variation in species richness among its clades and multiple instances of endemic radiation in Indo-Australasia (i.e., the Indo-Australian Archipelago and Australia), one of Earth's most biogeographically complex regions. We found heterogeneity in diversification dynamics across the family. Idiosyncratic biotic and geographic conditions appear to have driven diversification and morphological evolution in three endemic Indo-Australasian radiations. Furthermore, incumbency effects partially explain patterns in the biotic exchange between Australia and New Guinea. Our results offer insight into the dynamic history of Indo-Australasia, the evolutionary significance of competition, and the long-term consequences of incumbency effects.
dc.description.sponsorshipThis study was funded by an Australian Research Council grant to JSK. The graduate education of CJPV was financed by the Australian Government Research Training Program.
dc.format.mimetypeapplication/pdf
dc.language.isoen_AU
dc.publisherSociety for the Study of Evolution
dc.rights© 2020 The authors
dc.sourceEvolution
dc.source.urihttps://doi-org.virtual.anu.edu.au/10.1111/evo.14403
dc.subjectBiogeography
dc.subjectecological interactions
dc.subjectincumbency
dc.subjectmorphology
dc.subjectVaranidae
dc.subjectVaranus.
dc.titleCompetition and geography underlie speciation and morphological evolution in Indo-Australasian monitor lizards
dc.typeJournal article
local.description.notesImported from ARIES
local.identifier.citationvolume76
dc.date.issued2022
local.identifier.absfor310410 - Phylogeny and comparative analysis
local.identifier.ariespublicationu9511635xPUB2272
local.publisher.urlhttps://academic.oup.com/
local.type.statusPublished Version
local.contributor.affiliationPavon Vazquez, Carlos, College of Science, ANU
local.contributor.affiliationBrennan, Ian, College of Science, ANU
local.contributor.affiliationSkeels, Alexander, Institute of Terrestrial Ecosystems
local.contributor.affiliationKeogh, Scott, College of Science, ANU
local.description.embargo2099-12-31
local.bibliographicCitation.issue3
local.bibliographicCitation.startpage476
local.bibliographicCitation.lastpage495
local.identifier.doi10.1111/evo.14403
dc.date.updated2022-11-13T07:19:46Z
local.identifier.thomsonIDWOS:000728509900001
CollectionsANU Research Publications

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