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A smaller habenula is associated with increasing intensity of sexual selection

Hoops, Daniel; Whiting, Martin J.; Keogh, J. Scott

Description

The habenula is a small structure in the brain that acts as a relay station for neural information, helping to modulate behaviour in response to variable and unpredictable stimuli. Broadly, it is evolutionarily conserved in structure and connectivity across vertebrates, and is the most prominent bilaterally asymmetric structure in the brain. Nonetheless, comparative evolutionary studies of the habenula are virtually nonexistent. Here, we examine the volumes of the medial and lateral habenular...[Show more]

dc.contributor.authorHoops, Daniel
dc.contributor.authorWhiting, Martin J.
dc.contributor.authorKeogh, J. Scott
dc.date.accessioned2024-04-03T01:06:24Z
dc.identifier.issn0006-8977
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/1885/316480
dc.description.abstractThe habenula is a small structure in the brain that acts as a relay station for neural information, helping to modulate behaviour in response to variable and unpredictable stimuli. Broadly, it is evolutionarily conserved in structure and connectivity across vertebrates, and is the most prominent bilaterally asymmetric structure in the brain. Nonetheless, comparative evolutionary studies of the habenula are virtually nonexistent. Here, we examine the volumes of the medial and lateral habenular subregions, in both hemispheres, across a group of Australian agamid lizards in the genus Ctenophorus. In males, we found bilaterally asymmetrical selection on the lateral habenula to become smaller with increasing intensity of sexual selection, possibly as a mechanism to increase aggressive responses. In females, we found bilaterally symmetrical selection on both the medial and lateral subregions to become smaller with increasing sexual selection. This is consistent with sexual selection increasing motivation to reproduce and the habenula’s well characterized role in controlling and modifying responses to rewarding stimuli. However, as there are currently no studies addressing habenular function in reptiles, it is difficult to draw more precise conclusions. As has happened recently in biomedical neuroscience, it is time for the habenula to receive greater attention in evolutionary neuroscience.
dc.description.sponsorshipThis work was supported by grants to D.H. from the National Science and Engineering Council of Canada and The Australian National University; and by grants to M.J.W. and J.S.K. from the Australian Research Council.
dc.format.mimetypeapplication/pdf
dc.language.isoen_AU
dc.publisherS Karger AG
dc.rights© 2022 The Author(s). Published by S. Karger AG, Basel
dc.sourceBrain, Behavior and Evolution
dc.subjectBrain evolution
dc.subjectComparative neuroanatomy
dc.subjectLateralization
dc.subjectReproductive behaviour
dc.subjectReptiles
dc.titleA smaller habenula is associated with increasing intensity of sexual selection
dc.typeJournal article
local.description.notesImported from ARIES
local.identifier.citationvolume97
dc.date.issued2022
local.identifier.absfor310405 - Evolutionary ecology
local.identifier.absfor310301 - Behavioural ecology
local.identifier.ariespublicationu9511635xPUB2294
local.publisher.urlhttps://karger.com/
local.type.statusAccepted Version
local.contributor.affiliationHoops, Daniel, College of Science, ANU
local.contributor.affiliationWhiting, Martin J., Macquarie University
local.contributor.affiliationKeogh, Scott, College of Science, ANU
local.bibliographicCitation.issue5
local.bibliographicCitation.startpage265
local.bibliographicCitation.lastpage273
local.identifier.doi10.1159/000521750
dc.date.updated2022-11-13T07:19:47Z
dcterms.accessRightsOpen Access
dc.provenancehttps://v2.sherpa.ac.uk/id/publication/8979..."The Accepted Version can be archived in a Non-Commercial Institutional Repository" from SHERPA/RoMEO site (as at 3/04/2024).
CollectionsANU Research Publications

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