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Beltway: Getting around Garbage Collection Gridlock

Blackburn, Stephen; Jones, Richard; McKinley, Kathryn; Moss, J Eliot B

Description

We present the design and implementation of a new garbage collection framework that significantly generalizes existing copying collectors. The Beltway framework exploits and separates object age and incrementality. It groups objects in one or more increments on queues called belts, collects belts independently, and collects increments on a belt in first-in-first-out order. We show that Beltway configurations, selected by command line options, act and perform the same as semi-space,...[Show more]

dc.contributor.authorBlackburn, Stephen
dc.contributor.authorJones, Richard
dc.contributor.authorMcKinley, Kathryn
dc.contributor.authorMoss, J Eliot B
dc.date.accessioned2015-12-08T22:19:25Z
dc.identifier.issn0362-1340
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/1885/31555
dc.description.abstractWe present the design and implementation of a new garbage collection framework that significantly generalizes existing copying collectors. The Beltway framework exploits and separates object age and incrementality. It groups objects in one or more increments on queues called belts, collects belts independently, and collects increments on a belt in first-in-first-out order. We show that Beltway configurations, selected by command line options, act and perform the same as semi-space, generational, and older-first collectors, and encompass all previous copying collectors of which we are aware. The increasing reliance on garbage collected languages such as Java requires that the collector perform well. We show that the generality of Beltway enables us to design and implement new collectors that are robust to variations in heap size and improve total execution time over the best generational copying collectors of which we are aware by up to 40%, and on average by 5 to 10%, for small to moderate heap sizes. New garbage collection algorithms are rare, and yet we define not just one, but a new family of collectors that subsumes previous work. This generality enables us to explore a larger design space and build better collectors.
dc.publisherAssociation for Computing Machinery Inc (ACM)
dc.sourceACM SIGPLAN Notices
dc.subjectKeywords: Algorithms; Java programming language; Object oriented programming; Software engineering; Automatic heap management; Storage allocation (computer) Beltway; Copying collection; Generational collection; Java
dc.titleBeltway: Getting around Garbage Collection Gridlock
dc.typeJournal article
local.description.notesImported from ARIES
local.identifier.citationvolume37
dc.date.issued2002
local.identifier.absfor080308 - Programming Languages
local.identifier.ariespublicationu4105084xPUB84
local.type.statusPublished Version
local.contributor.affiliationBlackburn, Stephen, College of Engineering and Computer Science, ANU
local.contributor.affiliationJones, Richard, University of Kent
local.contributor.affiliationMcKinley, Kathryn, University of Texas
local.contributor.affiliationMoss, J Eliot B, University of Massachusetts
local.description.embargo2037-12-31
local.bibliographicCitation.issue5
local.bibliographicCitation.startpage153
local.bibliographicCitation.lastpage164
dc.date.updated2015-12-08T08:21:57Z
local.identifier.scopusID2-s2.0-0036036105
CollectionsANU Research Publications

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