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Towards a Framework for establishing Policy Success

Marsh, David; McConnell, Allan

Description

Claims that a particular policy has been a 'success' are commonplace in political life. However, a few of these claims are justified in any systematic way. This article seeks to remedy this omission by offering a heuristic which practitioners and academics can utilize to approach the question of whether a policy is, or was, successful. It builds initially on two sets of literature: Boyne's work on public sector improvement; and the work of Bovens et al. on success, failure and policy...[Show more]

dc.contributor.authorMarsh, David
dc.contributor.authorMcConnell, Allan
dc.date.accessioned2015-12-08T22:17:03Z
dc.identifier.issn0033-3298
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/1885/30959
dc.description.abstractClaims that a particular policy has been a 'success' are commonplace in political life. However, a few of these claims are justified in any systematic way. This article seeks to remedy this omission by offering a heuristic which practitioners and academics can utilize to approach the question of whether a policy is, or was, successful. It builds initially on two sets of literature: Boyne's work on public sector improvement; and the work of Bovens et al. on success, failure and policy evaluation. We discuss the epistemological issues involved in whether it is possible to produce an objective measure of 'success'. Subsequently, we present a framework for assessing success, focusing on three dimensions: process success; programmatic success; and political success. We then move on to raise a series of what we term complexity issues in relation to success for whom; variations across time, space and culture; and methodological issues.
dc.publisherBlackwell Publishing Ltd
dc.sourcePublic Administration
dc.subjectKeywords: heuristics; methodology; policy analysis; public sector
dc.titleTowards a Framework for establishing Policy Success
dc.typeJournal article
local.description.notesImported from ARIES
local.identifier.citationvolume88
dc.date.issued2010
local.identifier.absfor169999 - Studies in Human Society not elsewhere classified
local.identifier.ariespublicationu8501506xPUB78
local.type.statusPublished Version
local.contributor.affiliationMarsh, David, College of Arts and Social Sciences, ANU
local.contributor.affiliationMcConnell, Allan, University of Sydney
local.description.embargo2037-12-31
local.bibliographicCitation.issue2
local.bibliographicCitation.startpage564
local.bibliographicCitation.lastpage583
local.identifier.doi10.1111/j.1467-9299.2009.01803.x
local.identifier.absseo949999 - Law, Politics and Community Services not elsewhere classified
dc.date.updated2016-02-24T11:40:31Z
local.identifier.scopusID2-s2.0-77954781295
local.identifier.thomsonID000278678000017
CollectionsANU Research Publications

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