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The Public's Perception of the Plausibility of Dementia Risk Factors Is Not Influenced by Scientific Evidence

Low, Lee- Fay; Anstey, Kaarin

Description

Background/Aim: The public know little about risk factors for dementia. The aim of this study was to explore belief structures underlying how plausible risk factors for dementia appear to the general public. Methods: Two thousand members of the Australian public were surveyed by telephone on their beliefs regarding dementia risk factors. Factor analysis was performed on 17 modifiable behaviours that were rated by participants as increasing, not changing or decreasing the risk of dementia....[Show more]

dc.contributor.authorLow, Lee- Fay
dc.contributor.authorAnstey, Kaarin
dc.date.accessioned2015-12-08T22:16:27Z
dc.identifier.issn1420-8008
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/1885/30682
dc.description.abstractBackground/Aim: The public know little about risk factors for dementia. The aim of this study was to explore belief structures underlying how plausible risk factors for dementia appear to the general public. Methods: Two thousand members of the Australian public were surveyed by telephone on their beliefs regarding dementia risk factors. Factor analysis was performed on 17 modifiable behaviours that were rated by participants as increasing, not changing or decreasing the risk of dementia. Results: Three factors were obtained - Health and Lifestyle, Activity, and Nutrition. Items loading on the Health and Lifestyle factor were management of cardiovascular risk factors, drinking more water, reducing stress, coffee and tea, and alcohol intake. Items loading on the Activity factor were mental, physical and social activity and getting out and about more. Items loading on the Nutrition factor were eating foods high in omega-3 fatty acids, antioxidants and estrogen, using non-aluminium cookware and taking vitamin and nutritional supplements. Factors were characterised by similarity of items, rather than level of scientific evidence of an association with dementia. Factor scale scores differed according to sociodemographic characteristics. Conclusions: The public do not process dementia risk factor information based on level of scientific evidence.
dc.publisherS Karger AG
dc.sourceDementia and Geriatric Cognitive Disorders
dc.subjectKeywords: antioxidant; estrogen; omega 3 fatty acid; vitamin; adult; aged; alcohol consumption; article; behavior; cardiovascular risk; coffee; dementia; demography; diet supplementation; factorial analysis; female; fluid intake; food intake; health; health belief; Dementia, public perception; Public health; Risk reduction, dementia
dc.titleThe Public's Perception of the Plausibility of Dementia Risk Factors Is Not Influenced by Scientific Evidence
dc.typeJournal article
local.description.notesImported from ARIES
local.identifier.citationvolume23
dc.date.issued2007
local.identifier.absfor111714 - Mental Health
local.identifier.ariespublicationU4146231xPUB76
local.type.statusPublished Version
local.contributor.affiliationLow, Lee- Fay, College of Medicine, Biology and Environment, ANU
local.contributor.affiliationAnstey, Kaarin, College of Medicine, Biology and Environment, ANU
local.description.embargo2037-12-31
local.bibliographicCitation.startpage202
local.bibliographicCitation.lastpage206
local.identifier.doi10.1159/000099038
local.identifier.absseo920410 - Mental Health
dc.date.updated2015-12-08T08:01:27Z
local.identifier.scopusID2-s2.0-33847396512
CollectionsANU Research Publications

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