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Differences in the ultrastructure of their large warts allow white cypress pine (Callitris glaucophylla) to be distinguished from black cypress pine (C. endlicheri)

Heady, Roger; Cunningham, Ross; Evans, Philip

Description

White cypress pine (Callitris glaucophylla) wood is durable enough to be used outdoors, but occasionally there are reports of its premature failure in ground contact, which may be due to its substitution by the less durable species, black cypress pine (C. endlicheri). It has been difficult to prove this, however, because the woods of both species are very similar in structure and cannot be separated using conventional anatomical features. This study examined whether differences in the size and...[Show more]

dc.contributor.authorHeady, Roger
dc.contributor.authorCunningham, Ross
dc.contributor.authorEvans, Philip
dc.date.accessioned2015-12-08T22:14:38Z
dc.identifier.issn0043-7719
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/1885/30351
dc.description.abstractWhite cypress pine (Callitris glaucophylla) wood is durable enough to be used outdoors, but occasionally there are reports of its premature failure in ground contact, which may be due to its substitution by the less durable species, black cypress pine (C. endlicheri). It has been difficult to prove this, however, because the woods of both species are very similar in structure and cannot be separated using conventional anatomical features. This study examined whether differences in the size and morphology of warts on tracheid walls in the two species could be used to identify them. There were significant differences in the height, width and shape of warts in the two species, but there was considerable overlap in the distribution of these parameters between specimens. Warts in C. endlicheri were more likely to be bent-over near their tops than those in C. glaucophylla, and the angle bending of warts was greater in C. endlicheri. Quantification of these parameters produced complete separation of multiple specimens of the two species, and could potentially be used to help determine whether premature failure of C. glaucophylla heartwood in ground contact is the result of its substitution by C. endlicheri. More generally it can be concluded that the morphology of large warts may have taxonomic value in identifying coniferous wood species beyond the generic level.
dc.publisherSpringer
dc.sourceWood Science and Technology
dc.subjectKeywords: Parameter estimation; Taxonomies; Anatomical features; Coniferous wood species; Premature failure; Forestry; Anatomy; Callitris; Parameters; Pinus Nigra; Taxonomy; Warts; Callitris; Callitris glaucophylla; Widdringtonia cedarbergensis
dc.titleDifferences in the ultrastructure of their large warts allow white cypress pine (Callitris glaucophylla) to be distinguished from black cypress pine (C. endlicheri)
dc.typeJournal article
local.description.notesImported from ARIES
local.identifier.citationvolume42
dc.date.issued2008
local.identifier.absfor070599 - Forestry Sciences not elsewhere classified
local.identifier.ariespublicationU4279067xPUB73
local.type.statusPublished Version
local.contributor.affiliationHeady, Roger, College of Medicine, Biology and Environment, ANU
local.contributor.affiliationCunningham, Ross, College of Medicine, Biology and Environment, ANU
local.contributor.affiliationEvans, Philip, College of Medicine, Biology and Environment, ANU
local.description.embargo2037-12-31
local.bibliographicCitation.issue4
local.bibliographicCitation.startpage313
local.bibliographicCitation.lastpage323
local.identifier.doi10.1007/s00226-007-0174-1
dc.date.updated2015-12-08T07:52:59Z
local.identifier.scopusID2-s2.0-41149116072
CollectionsANU Research Publications

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