Skip navigation
Skip navigation

Biomechanics of human optic chiasmal compression: ex vivo experiment and finite element modelling

Wang, Xiaofei; Neely, Andrew; Jain, Neeranjali; Jain, Swaranjali; Jain, Sanjiv; Tahtali, Murat; McIlwaine, Gawn G.; Lueck, Christian

Description

The mechanism of bitemporal hemianopia arising as a result of chiasmal compression is unknown. In this study, we combined an ex vivo experiment and finite element modelling (FEM) to investigate its potential mechanism. A cadaveric human optic chiasm was scanned using micro-CT before and after deformation by inflation of Foley catheter, to simulate tumour growth from beneath. The geometry of the same chiasm was reconstructed and simulated using finite element analysis. Chiasmal deformations were...[Show more]

dc.contributor.authorWang, Xiaofei
dc.contributor.authorNeely, Andrew
dc.contributor.authorJain, Neeranjali
dc.contributor.authorJain, Swaranjali
dc.contributor.authorJain, Sanjiv
dc.contributor.authorTahtali, Murat
dc.contributor.authorMcIlwaine, Gawn G.
dc.contributor.authorLueck, Christian
dc.date.accessioned2023-07-18T23:57:13Z
dc.date.available2023-07-18T23:57:13Z
dc.identifier.issn2590-0935
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/1885/294392
dc.description.abstractThe mechanism of bitemporal hemianopia arising as a result of chiasmal compression is unknown. In this study, we combined an ex vivo experiment and finite element modelling (FEM) to investigate its potential mechanism. A cadaveric human optic chiasm was scanned using micro-CT before and after deformation by inflation of Foley catheter, to simulate tumour growth from beneath. The geometry of the same chiasm was reconstructed and simulated using finite element analysis. Chiasmal deformations were extracted from the simulation and compared with those observed during micro-CT scanning. In addition, nerve fibre models examining variation in local fibre distribution patterns of the chiasm were incorporated to investigate the strain (deformation) distributions of the chiasm at an axonal level. The FEM model matched the micro-CT scans well both qualitatively and quantitatively. Compression of the chiasm induced high strains in the paracentral portions of the chiasm where the crossing optic nerve fibres are located. At an axonal level, the magnitude of strains affecting crossed fibres were greater than those affecting uncrossed fibres. The high strains in the paracentral portions of the chiasm, combined with the differences in strain between crossed and uncrossed nerve fibres, are consistent with a biomechanical explanation for the pattern of visual field loss seen in chiasmal compression.
dc.description.sponsorshipSupported by National Natural Science Foundation of China (12002025).
dc.format.mimetypeapplication/pdf
dc.language.isoen_AU
dc.publisherElsevier BV
dc.rights© 2021 The authors
dc.rights.urihttp://creativecommons.org/licenses/ by-nc-nd/4.0/
dc.sourceMedicine in Novel Technology and Devices
dc.subjectBitemporal hemianopia
dc.subjectPituitary tumour
dc.subjectChiasm
dc.subjectFinite element modelling
dc.subjectOptic nerve fibre
dc.titleBiomechanics of human optic chiasmal compression: ex vivo experiment and finite element modelling
dc.typeJournal article
local.description.notesImported from ARIES
local.identifier.citationvolume13
dc.date.issued2022
local.identifier.absfor321201 - Ophthalmology
local.identifier.absfor320903 - Central nervous system
local.identifier.absfor320904 - Computational neuroscience (incl. mathematical neuroscience and theoretical neuroscience)
local.identifier.ariespublicationa383154xPUB26053
local.publisher.urlhttps://www.sciencedirect.com/
local.type.statusPublished Version
local.contributor.affiliationWang, Xiaofei, University of new South Wales
local.contributor.affiliationNeely, Andrew, University of New South Wales
local.contributor.affiliationJain, Neeranjali, Department of Neurology, The Canberra Hospital, Canberra
local.contributor.affiliationJain, Swaranjali, The Canberra Hospital
local.contributor.affiliationJain, Sanjiv, Canberra Hospital
local.contributor.affiliationTahtali, Murat, University of New South Wales
local.contributor.affiliationMcIlwaine, Gawn G., Queen's University, Belfast
local.contributor.affiliationLueck, Christian, College of Health and Medicine, ANU
local.bibliographicCitation.startpage1
local.bibliographicCitation.lastpage8
local.identifier.doi10.1016/j.medntd.2021.100113
local.identifier.absseo200101 - Diagnosis of human diseases and conditions
dc.date.updated2022-05-15T08:16:54Z
local.identifier.scopusID2-s2.0-85122957763
dcterms.accessRightsOpen Access
dc.provenanceThis is an open access article under the CCBY-NC-ND license(http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by nc-nd/4.0/)
dc.rights.licenseCreative Commons Attribution licence
CollectionsANU Research Publications

Download

File Description SizeFormat Image
1-s2.0-S2590093521000576-main.pdf1.81 MBAdobe PDFThumbnail


This item is licensed under a Creative Commons License Creative Commons

Updated:  17 November 2022/ Responsible Officer:  University Librarian/ Page Contact:  Library Systems & Web Coordinator