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Cyclic gas exchange in the giant burrowing cockroach, Macropanesthia rhinoceros : Effect of oxygen tension and temperature

Woodman, James; Cooper, Paul; Haritos, Victoria S

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The giant burrowing cockroach, Macropanesthia rhinoceros, is endemic to north-eastern Australia and excavates a permanent burrow up to 1 m deep into soil. Using flow-through respirometry, we investigated gas exchange and water loss at three different oxygen tensions (21%, 10% and 2% at 20 °C) and temperatures (10, 20 and 30 °C at 21% oxygen). M. rhinoceros employ cyclic gas exchange (CGE) making the species by far the largest insect known to engage in discontinuous ventilation. CGE featured...[Show more]

dc.contributor.authorWoodman, James
dc.contributor.authorCooper, Paul
dc.contributor.authorHaritos, Victoria S
dc.date.accessioned2015-12-08T22:10:31Z
dc.identifier.issn0022-1910
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/1885/29373
dc.description.abstractThe giant burrowing cockroach, Macropanesthia rhinoceros, is endemic to north-eastern Australia and excavates a permanent burrow up to 1 m deep into soil. Using flow-through respirometry, we investigated gas exchange and water loss at three different oxygen tensions (21%, 10% and 2% at 20 °C) and temperatures (10, 20 and 30 °C at 21% oxygen). M. rhinoceros employ cyclic gas exchange (CGE) making the species by far the largest insect known to engage in discontinuous ventilation. CGE featured rhythmic bursts of CO2 dispersed among inter-burst periods of reduced output. CGE was most commonly observed at 20 °C and degraded at <10% oxygen. Mild hypoxia (10% oxygen) resulted in a lengthening of the burst period by approximately two-fold; this result is complementary to oxygen consumption data that suggests that the burst period is important in oxygen uptake. When exposed to severe hypoxia (2% oxygen), CGE was degraded to a more erratic continuous pattern. Also, during severe hypoxia, total water loss increased significantly, although CO2 release was maintained at the same level as in 21% oxygen. During CGE, an increase in temperature from 10 to 20 °C caused both water loss and CO2 output to double; from 20 to 30 °C, CO2 output again doubled but water loss increased by only 31%.
dc.publisherElsevier
dc.sourceJournal of Insect Physiology
dc.subjectKeywords: carbon dioxide; oxygen; water; burrowing organism; carbon dioxide; cockroach; desiccation; endemic species; gas exchange; hypoxia; oxygen; respiration; subterranean environment; temperature effect; animal; article; cockroach; female; lung gas exchange; ma Giant burrowing cockroach; Hypoxia; Insect; Respirometry; Underground
dc.titleCyclic gas exchange in the giant burrowing cockroach, Macropanesthia rhinoceros : Effect of oxygen tension and temperature
dc.typeJournal article
local.description.notesImported from ARIES
local.identifier.citationvolume53
dc.date.issued2007
local.identifier.absfor060604 - Comparative Physiology
local.identifier.ariespublicationu9511635xPUB64
local.type.statusPublished Version
local.contributor.affiliationWoodman, James, College of Medicine, Biology and Environment, ANU
local.contributor.affiliationCooper, Paul, College of Medicine, Biology and Environment, ANU
local.contributor.affiliationHaritos, Victoria S, CSIRO
local.description.embargo2037-12-31
local.bibliographicCitation.startpage497
local.bibliographicCitation.lastpage504
local.identifier.doi10.1016/j.jinsphys.2007.01.012
dc.date.updated2015-12-08T07:33:09Z
local.identifier.scopusID2-s2.0-34247587185
CollectionsANU Research Publications

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