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Conservation and turnover of miRNAs and their highly complementary targets in early branching animals

Praher, Daniela; Zimmermann, Bob; Dnyansagar, Rohit; Miller, David J.; Moya, A.; Modepalli, Vengamanaidu; Fridrich, Arie; Sher, Daniel; Friis-Moller, Lene; Sundberg, Per; Forêt, Sylvain; Ashby, Regan

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MicroRNAs (miRNAs) are crucial post-transcriptional regulators that have been extensively studied in Bilateria, a group comprising the majority of extant animals, where more than 30 conserved miRNA families have been identified. By contrast, bilaterian miRNA targets are largely not conserved. Cnidaria is the sister group to Bilateria and thus provides a unique opportunity for comparative studies. Strikingly, like their plant counterparts, cnidarian miRNAs have been shown to predominantly have...[Show more]

dc.contributor.authorPraher, Daniela
dc.contributor.authorZimmermann, Bob
dc.contributor.authorDnyansagar, Rohit
dc.contributor.authorMiller, David J.
dc.contributor.authorMoya, A.
dc.contributor.authorModepalli, Vengamanaidu
dc.contributor.authorFridrich, Arie
dc.contributor.authorSher, Daniel
dc.contributor.authorFriis-Moller, Lene
dc.contributor.authorSundberg, Per
dc.contributor.authorForêt, Sylvain
dc.contributor.authorAshby, Regan
dc.date.accessioned2023-01-25T03:28:51Z
dc.date.available2023-01-25T03:28:51Z
dc.identifier.issn0962-8452
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/1885/283970
dc.description.abstractMicroRNAs (miRNAs) are crucial post-transcriptional regulators that have been extensively studied in Bilateria, a group comprising the majority of extant animals, where more than 30 conserved miRNA families have been identified. By contrast, bilaterian miRNA targets are largely not conserved. Cnidaria is the sister group to Bilateria and thus provides a unique opportunity for comparative studies. Strikingly, like their plant counterparts, cnidarian miRNAs have been shown to predominantly have highly complementary targets leading to transcript cleavage by Argonaute proteins. Here, we assess the conservation of miRNAs and their targets by small RNA sequencing followed by miRNA target prediction in eight species of Anthozoa (sea anemones and corals), the earliest-branching cnidarian class. We uncover dozens of novel miRNAs but only a few conserved ones. Further, given their high complementarity, we were able to computationally identify miRNA targets in each species. Besides evidence for conservation of specific miRNA target sites, which are maintained between sea anemones and stony corals across 500 Myr of evolution, we also find indications for convergent evolution of target regulation by different miRNAs. Our data indicate that cnidarians have only few conserved miRNAs and corresponding targets, despite their high complementarity, suggesting a high evolutionary turnover.
dc.description.sponsorshipThis work was supported by grants of the Austrian Science Fund FWF (grant nos. P22618, P24858) to U.T., European Research Council Starting Grant (CNIDARIAMICRORNA, 637456) to Y.M., a PhD completion fellowship of the University of Vienna to D.P. and a grant of the Australian Research Council (grant no. CE140100020) to D.J.M. The collection of S. callimorphus was supported by Assemble grant 227799 to U.T.
dc.format.mimetypeapplication/pdf
dc.language.isoen_AU
dc.publisherRoyal Society of London
dc.rights© 2021 The authors
dc.rights.urihttp://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/4.0/
dc.sourceProceedings of the Royal Society of London Series B: Biological Sciences
dc.subjectmicroRNAs
dc.subjectmiRNAs
dc.subjectcnidaria
dc.subjectconservation,
dc.subjectturnover
dc.subjectmicroRNA targets
dc.titleConservation and turnover of miRNAs and their highly complementary targets in early branching animals
dc.typeJournal article
local.description.notesImported from ARIES
local.identifier.citationvolume288
dc.date.issued2021
local.identifier.absfor310508 - Genome structure and regulation
local.identifier.ariespublicationu9511635xPUB2163
local.publisher.urlhttps://royalsocietypublishing.org/
local.type.statusPublished Version
local.contributor.affiliationPraher, Daniela, University of Vienna
local.contributor.affiliationZimmermann, Bob, University of Vienna
local.contributor.affiliationDnyansagar, Rohit, University of Vienna
local.contributor.affiliationMiller, David J., James Cook University
local.contributor.affiliationMoya, A., James Cook University
local.contributor.affiliationModepalli, Vengamanaidu, The Hebrew University of Jerusalem
local.contributor.affiliationFridrich, Arie, The Hebrew University of Jerusalem
local.contributor.affiliationSher, Daniel, University of Haifa
local.contributor.affiliationFriis-Moller, Lene, Technical University of Denmark
local.contributor.affiliationSundberg, Per, University of Gothenburg
local.contributor.affiliationForet, Sylvain, College of Science, ANU
local.contributor.affiliationAshby, Regan, University of Canberra
dc.relationhttp://purl.org/au-research/grants/arc/ CE140100020
local.bibliographicCitation.issue1945
local.identifier.doi10.1098/rspb.2020.3169
dc.date.updated2021-11-28T07:37:44Z
dcterms.accessRightsOpen Access
dc.provenancePublished by the Royal Society under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution License http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/4.0/, which permits unrestricted use, provided the original author and source are credited.
dc.rights.licenseCreative Commons Attribution licence
CollectionsANU Research Publications

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