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Examining Change in Self-Reported Gambling Measures Over Time as Related to Socially Desirable Responding Bias

Schell, Christina; Godinho, Alexandra; Cunningham, John

Description

Socially desirable responding is a response bias that can affect the accuracy of self-reports. It is especially likely when questions address sensitive topics, such as gambling attitudes, problems and behaviours. A sample of 321 participants were recruited from Amazon's mTurk crowdsourcing platform for a randomized controlled trial investigating an online gambling intervention. Data from this study was used to examine the influence of socially desirable responding on gambling self-report...[Show more]

dc.contributor.authorSchell, Christina
dc.contributor.authorGodinho, Alexandra
dc.contributor.authorCunningham, John
dc.date.accessioned2022-10-05T02:33:04Z
dc.identifier.issn1573-3602
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/1885/274298
dc.description.abstractSocially desirable responding is a response bias that can affect the accuracy of self-reports. It is especially likely when questions address sensitive topics, such as gambling attitudes, problems and behaviours. A sample of 321 participants were recruited from Amazon's mTurk crowdsourcing platform for a randomized controlled trial investigating an online gambling intervention. Data from this study was used to examine the influence of socially desirable responding on gambling self-report measures over time. At baseline, self-deception (SD), a factor of socially desirable responding, was significantly higher among males than females and among those with household incomes greater than $20,000 per year. Controlling for demographic variability, mixed effects models examining the relationship between socially desirable responding factors [SD and impression management (IM)] and time were conducted. Among males, there were significant interactions between IM with the NORC DSM-IV screen for gambling problems (NODS) and the gambling symptom assessment scale (G-SAS) scores respectively, over time. In other words, males with higher IM scores, demonstrated less change in NODS and G-SAS scores from baseline to 6-month follow-up compared to males with lower IM scores. There were no significant interactions in any models among females or among the full sample. Controlling the well-documented effect of socially desirable responding on self-reported measures in addictions research should be considered as a method to help reduce error and improve validity. Future research should continue to examine the effect of this bias on gambling measures over time and in each gender.
dc.description.sponsorshipThis research was undertaken in part thanks to funding from the Canada Research Chairs program for support of Dr. Cunningham, the Canada Research Chair in Addictions. Support to CAMH for salary and infrastructure has been provided by the Ministry of Health and Long-Term Care
dc.format.mimetypeapplication/pdf
dc.language.isoen_AU
dc.publisherSpringer
dc.rights© Springer Science+Business Media, LLC, part of Springer Nature 2020
dc.sourceJournal of Gambling Studies
dc.subjectSocially desirable responding
dc.subjectBalanced inventory of desirable responding
dc.subjectGender diferences
dc.subjectGambling
dc.titleExamining Change in Self-Reported Gambling Measures Over Time as Related to Socially Desirable Responding Bias
dc.typeJournal article
local.description.notesImported from ARIES
local.identifier.citationvolume37
dc.date.issued2020
local.identifier.absfor420313 - Mental health services
local.identifier.ariespublicationa383154xPUB15319
local.publisher.urlhttps://link.springer.com/
local.type.statusPublished Version
local.contributor.affiliationSchell, Christina, Centre for Addiction and Mental Health
local.contributor.affiliationGodinho, Alexandra, Centre for Addiction and Mental Health
local.contributor.affiliationCunningham, John, College of Health and Medicine, ANU
local.description.embargo2099-12-31
local.bibliographicCitation.startpage1043
local.bibliographicCitation.lastpage1054
local.identifier.doi10.1007/s10899-020-09970-1
dc.date.updated2021-11-28T07:21:14Z
local.identifier.scopusID2-s2.0-85088804613
CollectionsANU Research Publications

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