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Extracellular vesicles from the apoplastic fungal wheat pathogen Zymoseptoria tritici

Hill, Erin; Solomon, Peter

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Background: The fungal pathogen Zymoseptoria tritici is a signifcant constraint to wheat production in temperate cropping regions around the world. Despite its agronomic impacts, the mechanisms allowing the pathogen to asymptomatically invade and grow in the apoplast of wheat leaves before causing extensive host cell death remain elusive. Given recent evidence of extracellular vesicles (EVs)—secreted, membrane-bound nanoparticles containing molecular cargo—being implicated in extracellular...[Show more]

dc.contributor.authorHill, Erin
dc.contributor.authorSolomon, Peter
dc.date.accessioned2022-10-04T01:18:30Z
dc.date.available2022-10-04T01:18:30Z
dc.identifier.issn2054-3085
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/1885/274257
dc.description.abstractBackground: The fungal pathogen Zymoseptoria tritici is a signifcant constraint to wheat production in temperate cropping regions around the world. Despite its agronomic impacts, the mechanisms allowing the pathogen to asymptomatically invade and grow in the apoplast of wheat leaves before causing extensive host cell death remain elusive. Given recent evidence of extracellular vesicles (EVs)—secreted, membrane-bound nanoparticles containing molecular cargo—being implicated in extracellular communication between plants and fungal pathogen, we have initiated an in vitro investigation of EVs from this apoplastic fungal wheat pathogen. We aimed to isolate EVs from Z. tritici broth cultures and examine their protein composition in relation to the soluble protein in the culture fltrate and to existing fungal EV proteomes. Results: Zymoseptoria tritici EVs were isolated from broth culture fltrates using diferential ultracentrifugation (DUC) and examined with transmission electron microscopy (TEM) and nanoparticle tracking analysis (NTA). Z. tritici EVs were observed as a heterogeneous population of particles, with most between 50 and 250 nm. These particles were found in abundance in the culture fltrates of viable Z. tritici cultures, but not heat-killed cultures incubated for an equivalent time and of comparable biomass. Bottom-up proteomic analysis using LC–MS/MS, followed by stringent fltering revealed 240 Z. tritici EV proteins. These proteins were distinct from soluble proteins identifed in Z. tritici culture fltrates, but were similar to proteins identifed in EVs from other fungi, based on sequence similarity analyses. Notably, a putative marker protein recently identifed in Candida albicans EVs was also consistently detected in Z. tritici EVs. Conclusion: We have shown EVs can be isolated from the devastating fungal wheat pathogen Z. tritici and are similar to protein composition to previously characterised fungal EVs. EVs from human pathogenic fungi are implicated in virulence, but the role of EVs in the interaction of phytopathogenic fungi and their hosts is unknown. These in vitro analyses provide a basis for expanding investigations of Z. tritici EVs in planta, to examine their involvement in the infection process of this apoplastic wheat pathogen and more broadly, advance understanding of noncanonical secretion in flamentous plant pathogens
dc.description.sponsorshipEHH was supported by an Australian Government Research Training Program (RTP) Scholarship and a Grains Research and Development Corp. (GRDC) Grains Research Scholarship (GRS)
dc.format.mimetypeapplication/pdf
dc.language.isoen_AU
dc.publisherBioMed Central
dc.rights© The Author(s) 2020.
dc.rights.urihttps://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/4.0/
dc.sourceFungal Biology and Biotechnology
dc.subjectExtracellular vesicles
dc.subjectZymoseptoria tritici
dc.subjectWheat disease
dc.titleExtracellular vesicles from the apoplastic fungal wheat pathogen Zymoseptoria tritici
dc.typeJournal article
local.description.notesImported from ARIES
local.identifier.citationvolume7
dc.date.issued2020
local.identifier.absfor310806 - Plant physiology
local.identifier.ariespublicationa383154xPUB14616
local.publisher.urlhttps://fungalbiolbiotech.biomedcentral.com/
local.type.statusPublished Version
local.contributor.affiliationHill, Erin, College of Science, ANU
local.contributor.affiliationSolomon, Peter, College of Science, ANU
local.bibliographicCitation.issue1
local.bibliographicCitation.startpage1
local.bibliographicCitation.lastpage14
local.identifier.doi10.1186/s40694-020-00103-2
local.identifier.absseo260312 - Wheat
dc.date.updated2021-11-28T07:20:55Z
local.identifier.scopusID2-s2.0-85092554707
dcterms.accessRightsOpen Access
dc.provenanceThis article is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution 4.0 International License, which permits use, sharing, adaptation, distribution and reproduction in any medium or format, as long as you give appropriate credit to the original author(s) and the source, provide a link to the Creative Commons licence, and indicate if changes were made. The images or other third party material in this article are included in the article’s Creative Commons licence, unless indicated otherwise in a credit line to the material. If material is not included in the article’s Creative Commons licence and your intended use is not permitted by statutory regulation or exceeds the permitted use, you will need to obtain permission directly from the copyright holder. To view a copy of this licence, visit http://creativeco mmons.org/licenses/by/4.0/. The Creative Commons Public Domain Dedication waiver (http://creativecommons.org/publicdomain/ zero/1.0/) applies to the data made available in this article, unless otherwise stated in a credit line to the data.
dc.rights.licenseCreative Commons Attribution 4.0 International License
CollectionsANU Research Publications

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