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Metabolic responses to waterlogging differ between roots and shoots and reflect phloem transport alteration in medicago truncatula

Lothier, Jeremy; Diab, Houssein; Cukier, Caroline; Limami, Anis M.; Tcherkez, Guillaume

Description

Root oxygen deficiency that is induced by flooding (waterlogging) is a common situation in many agricultural areas, causing considerable loss in yield and productivity. Physiological and metabolic acclimation to hypoxia has mostly been studied on roots or whole seedlings under full submergence. The metabolic difference between shoots and roots during waterlogging, and how roots and shoots communicate in such a situation is much less known. In particular, the metabolic acclimation in shoots and...[Show more]

dc.contributor.authorLothier, Jeremy
dc.contributor.authorDiab, Houssein
dc.contributor.authorCukier, Caroline
dc.contributor.authorLimami, Anis M.
dc.contributor.authorTcherkez, Guillaume
dc.date.accessioned2022-10-04T00:44:26Z
dc.date.available2022-10-04T00:44:26Z
dc.identifier.issn2223-7747
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/1885/274253
dc.description.abstractRoot oxygen deficiency that is induced by flooding (waterlogging) is a common situation in many agricultural areas, causing considerable loss in yield and productivity. Physiological and metabolic acclimation to hypoxia has mostly been studied on roots or whole seedlings under full submergence. The metabolic difference between shoots and roots during waterlogging, and how roots and shoots communicate in such a situation is much less known. In particular, the metabolic acclimation in shoots and how this, in turn, impacts on roots metabolism is not well documented. Here, we monitored changes in the metabolome of roots and shoots of barrel clover (Medicago truncatula), growth, and gas-exchange, and analyzed phloem sap exudate composition. Roots exhibited a typical response to hypoxia, such as γ-aminobutyrate and alanine accumulation, as well as a strong decline in raffinose, sucrose, hexoses, and pentoses. Leaves exhibited a strong increase in starch, sugars, sugar derivatives, and phenolics (tyrosine, tryptophan, phenylalanine, benzoate, ferulate), suggesting an inhibition of sugar export and their alternative utilization by aromatic compounds production via pentose phosphates and phosphoenolpyruvate. Accordingly, there was an enrichment in sugars and a decline in organic acids in phloem sap exudates under waterlogging. Mass-balance calculations further suggest an increased imbalance between loading by shoots and unloading by roots under waterlogging. Taken as a whole, our results are consistent with the inhibition of sugar import by waterlogged roots, leading to an increase in phloem sugar pool, which, in turn, exert negative feedback on sugar metabolism and utilization in shoots.
dc.description.sponsorshipThis research was funded by the Région Pays de la Loire and Angers Loire Métropole, via the grant Connect Talent Isoseed
dc.format.mimetypeapplication/pdf
dc.language.isoen_AU
dc.publisherMDPI
dc.rights© 2020 by the authors. Licensee MDPI, Basel, Switzerland.
dc.rights.urihttps://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/4.0/
dc.sourcePlants
dc.subjectwaterlogging
dc.subjecthypoxia
dc.subjectmetabolomics
dc.subjectphloem
dc.titleMetabolic responses to waterlogging differ between roots and shoots and reflect phloem transport alteration in medicago truncatula
dc.typeJournal article
local.description.notesImported from ARIES
local.identifier.citationvolume9
dc.date.issued2020
local.identifier.absfor310806 - Plant physiology
local.identifier.ariespublicationa383154xPUB14564
local.publisher.urlhttps://www.mdpi.com/
local.type.statusPublished Version
local.contributor.affiliationLothier, Jeremy, Université d’Angers
local.contributor.affiliationDiab, Houssein, Université d’Angers
local.contributor.affiliationCukier, Caroline, Université d’Angers
local.contributor.affiliationLimami, Anis M., University of Angers
local.contributor.affiliationTcherkez, Guillaume, College of Science, ANU
local.bibliographicCitation.issue10
local.bibliographicCitation.startpage1
local.bibliographicCitation.lastpage18
local.identifier.doi10.3390/plants9101373
local.identifier.absseo280102 - Expanding knowledge in the biological sciences
dc.date.updated2021-11-28T07:20:54Z
local.identifier.scopusID2-s2.0-85092741140
dcterms.accessRightsOpen Access
dc.provenanceThis article is an open access article distributed under the terms and conditions of the Creative Commons Attribution (CC BY) license (http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/4.0/).
dc.rights.licenseCreative Commons Attribution (CC BY) license
CollectionsANU Research Publications

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