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Factors Associated with Stress among First-year Undergraduate Students Attending an Australian University

Lee, Patricia; Ahmed, Faruk; Pathirana, Thanya; Papier, Keren

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Objective: The aim of this study was to examine the relationship between stress and various socio-demographic, health and behavioural factors among undergraduate students studying in an Australian university. Methods: A cross-sectional survey was carried out among first-year undergraduate students studying at Griffith University. Participants were recruited from four different academic groups (N=728). The questionnaire used in this study comprised of three sections: socio-demographic...[Show more]

dc.contributor.authorLee, Patricia
dc.contributor.authorAhmed, Faruk
dc.contributor.authorPathirana, Thanya
dc.contributor.authorPapier, Keren
dc.date.accessioned2022-08-30T22:26:36Z
dc.date.available2022-08-30T22:26:36Z
dc.identifier.issn2059-8564
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/1885/271935
dc.description.abstractObjective: The aim of this study was to examine the relationship between stress and various socio-demographic, health and behavioural factors among undergraduate students studying in an Australian university. Methods: A cross-sectional survey was carried out among first-year undergraduate students studying at Griffith University. Participants were recruited from four different academic groups (N=728). The questionnaire used in this study comprised of three sections: socio-demographic information, stress scale and a food frequency questionnaire. K-means Cluster analysis was performed to identify the major dietary patterns and multinomial logistic regression analysis was used to examine the factors associated with stress. Results: Nearly 53% of the students had some degree of stress with 37.4% experiencing moderate to severe levels of stress. The factors most strongly associated with having mild or moderate/ severe stress levels included being in a relationship [OR =1.71, 95% CI (1.02-2.87) and OR=1.61, 95% CI (1.06-2.44)], studying a non-health related degree [OR=1.68, 95% CI (1.03-2.73) and OR=1.51, 95% CI (1.04-2.19)], working ≥ 21 hours per week [OR=2.12, 95% CI (1.02-4.40) and OR=2.21, 95% CI (1.32- 3.67)], and engaging in an unhealthy dietary pattern [OR=2.67, 95% CI (1.25-5.72) and OR=2.76, 95% CI (1.47-5.16)]. Being a female [OR=1.84, 95% CI (1.25-2.72)], living in a shared accommodation [OR=0.52, 95% CI (0.27-0.98)], rarely exercising [OR=2.64, 95% CI (1.59-4.39)], having a body mass index (BMI) of 25 or over [OR=2.03, 95% CI (1.36-3.04)], and engaging in a dietary pattern that was low in protein, fruit and vegetables [OR=1.72, 95% CI (1.06-2.77)] were also associated with having moderate/severe stress levels. Conclusion: This study found that more than half of the undergraduate students had some levels of stress. Both mild and moderate/severe levels of stress were associated with sociodemographic characteristics, risky health behaviours and poor dietary patterns. Our findings reinforce the need to promote healthy behaviours among undergraduate university students in order to maintain good mental health.
dc.format.mimetypeapplication/pdf
dc.language.isoen_AU
dc.publisherVerizona Publisher (VZP)
dc.rights© 2016 The authors
dc.rights.urihttp://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/4.0/
dc.sourceFood and Nutrition Report
dc.subjectStress, Factors
dc.subjectFactors
dc.subjectDietary pattern
dc.subjectUniversity students
dc.subjectAustralia
dc.titleFactors Associated with Stress among First-year Undergraduate Students Attending an Australian University
dc.typeJournal article
local.description.notesImported from ARIES
local.identifier.citationvolume1
dc.date.issued2016
local.identifier.absfor000000 - Internal ANU use only
local.identifier.ariespublicationu5684624xPUB113
local.publisher.urlhttp://verizonaonlinepublishing.com/
local.type.statusPublished Version
local.contributor.affiliationLee, Patricia, Griffith University
local.contributor.affiliationAhmed, Faruk, Griffith University
local.contributor.affiliationPathirana, Thanya, Griffith University
local.contributor.affiliationPapier, Keren, College of Health and Medicine, ANU
local.bibliographicCitation.issue3
local.bibliographicCitation.startpage17
local.bibliographicCitation.lastpage24
local.identifier.doi10.24218/fnr.2015.13
dc.date.updated2021-08-01T08:41:18Z
dcterms.accessRightsOpen Access
dc.provenanceThis is an open-access article distributed under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original author and source are credited.
dc.rights.licenseCreative Commons Attribution licence
CollectionsANU Research Publications

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