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Severe euphoria and mild hopelessness: The language of online bipolar disorder diagnostic information

Campbell, Tina

Description

Bipolar disorder is a chronic mental illness with a global prevalence of 1–2% (Grande, Berk, Birmaher, & Vieta, 2016) and a suicide rate more than 20 times that of the general population (Altamura et al., 2010). Receiving a bipolar disorder diagnosis can be a life-altering event with implications for selfhood and identity (M. L. Inder et al., 2008) as well as the need to accept ongoing, often lifelong, treatment. Psychoeducation plays an important part in...[Show more]

dc.contributor.authorCampbell, Tina
dc.date.accessioned2022-06-03T03:40:22Z
dc.date.available2022-06-03T03:40:22Z
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/1885/266902
dc.description.abstractBipolar disorder is a chronic mental illness with a global prevalence of 1–2% (Grande, Berk, Birmaher, & Vieta, 2016) and a suicide rate more than 20 times that of the general population (Altamura et al., 2010). Receiving a bipolar disorder diagnosis can be a life-altering event with implications for selfhood and identity (M. L. Inder et al., 2008) as well as the need to accept ongoing, often lifelong, treatment. Psychoeducation plays an important part in diagnosis acceptance which in turn facilitates better illness management and more positive outcomes. Although many patients would prefer to receive information from their healthcare providers, up to 75% use the Internet as their primary bipolar information source (Kerner et al., 2019). Prior research has assessed the accuracy and readability of bipolar websites (Morel, Chatton, Cochand, Zullino, & Khazaal, 2008), however, to date no one has closely analysed the language used on these websites and the impact it may have on information seekers. This qualitative study takes a grounded approach to examine the language of online bipolar information sources, using psychiatrists’ insights as a reference point, and finds that much of the information on bipolar websites is couched in confusing or stigmatising language and, despite strongly advising against self-diagnosis, many sites actively enable self-diagnosis. The study also reveals a contrast between psychiatrists’ approach to diagnosis delivery and the uncertainty that is necessarily embedded in the process, and the way this is depicted on websites. An implication of these findings is that psychiatrists may not be familiar with the content of popular websites and could benefit from guidance when choosing which online resources to recommend to their patients.
dc.language.isoen_AU
dc.subjectbipolar disorder
dc.subjectmental illness
dc.subjecthealthcare communication
dc.subjectonline information sources
dc.titleSevere euphoria and mild hopelessness: The language of online bipolar disorder diagnostic information
dc.typeThesis (Masters)
dcterms.valid2022
local.description.notesthe author deposited 3.06.2022
local.type.degreeOther
dc.date.issued2022
local.identifier.doi10.25911/J9W7-2P67
local.mintdoimint
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