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Investigation of Game-Theoretic Mechanisms for the Valuation of Energy Resources

Burgess, Mark

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Electricity systems are facing the pressure to change in response to the effects of new technology, particularly the proliferation of renewable technologies (such as solar PV systems and wind generation) leading to the retirement of traditional generation technologies that provide stabilising inertia. These changes create an imperative to consider potential future market structures to facilitate the participation of distributed energy resources (DERs; such as EVs and batteries) in grid...[Show more]

dc.contributor.authorBurgess, Mark
dc.date.accessioned2022-05-28T07:45:44Z
dc.date.available2022-05-28T07:45:44Z
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/1885/266429
dc.description.abstractElectricity systems are facing the pressure to change in response to the effects of new technology, particularly the proliferation of renewable technologies (such as solar PV systems and wind generation) leading to the retirement of traditional generation technologies that provide stabilising inertia. These changes create an imperative to consider potential future market structures to facilitate the participation of distributed energy resources (DERs; such as EVs and batteries) in grid operation. However, this gives rise to general questions surrounding the ethics of market structures and how they could be fairly applied in future electricity systems. Particularly the most basic question "how should electricity be valued and traded" is fundamentally a moral question without any easy answer. We give a survey of philosophical attitudes around such a question, before presenting a series of ways that these intuitions have been cast into mathematics, including: the Vickrey-Clarke-Groves mechanism, Locational Marginal Pricing, the Shapley Value, and Nash bargaining solution concepts. We compared these different methods, and attempted a new synthesis that brought together the best features of each of them; called the 'Generalised Neyman and Kohlberg Value' or the GNK-value for short. The GNK value was developed as a novel bargaining solution concept for many player non-cooperative transferable utility generalised games, and thus it was intrinsically flexible in its application to various aspects of powersystems. We demonstrated the features of the GNK-value against the other mathematical solutions in the context of trading the immediate consumption/generation of power on small sized networks under linear-DC approximation, before extending the computation to larger networks. The GNK value proved to be difficult to compute for large networks but was shown to be approximable for larger networks with a series of sampling techniques and a proxy method. The GNK value was ethically compared to other mechanisms with the unfortunate discovery that it allowed for participants to be left worse-off for participating, violating the ethical notion of 'euvoluntary exchange' and 'individual rationality'; but was offered as an interesting innovation in the space of transferable utility generalised games notwithstanding. For sampling the GNK value, there was a range of new and different techniques developed for stratified random sampling which iteratively minimise newly derived concentration inequalities on the error of the sampling. These techniques were developed to assist in the computation of the GNK value to larger networks, and they were evaluated in the context of sampling synthetic data, and in computation of the Shapley Value of cooperative game theory. These new sampling techniques were demonstrated to be comparable to the more orthodox Neyman sampling method despite not having access to stratum variances.
dc.language.isoen_AU
dc.titleInvestigation of Game-Theoretic Mechanisms for the Valuation of Energy Resources
dc.typeThesis (PhD)
local.contributor.supervisorThiebaux, Sylvie
local.contributor.supervisorcontactu4033066@anu.edu.au
dc.date.issued2022
local.identifier.doi10.25911/QPY5-7Z79
local.identifier.proquestYes
local.thesisANUonly.author51877b88-3331-4e87-b07e-7fbd5e269fda
local.thesisANUonly.title000000012304_TC_1
local.thesisANUonly.keyfcc622d2-5335-9231-3165-e5672bcd63df
local.mintdoimint
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