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Reconstruction of paleo-particulate organic carbon fluxes for the Campbell Plateau region of southern New Zealand using the zinc content of sponge spicules

Ellwood, Michael; Kelly, Michelle; Neil, Helen; Nodder, Scott D

Description

The zinc concentration of siliceous sponge spicules was determined from spicules recovered from four sediment cores spanning the last 160 kyr, from the Campbell Plateau region southeast of New Zealand. Zinc/Si results showed little difference between Holocene and glacial aged spicules. An increase in Zn/Si was observed for core Y14, where Zn/Si peaked at about 0.6 μmol/mol during marine isotope stages 5a-5b. To better understand the role carbon export has on sponge Zn/Si, we explored the strong...[Show more]

dc.contributor.authorEllwood, Michael
dc.contributor.authorKelly, Michelle
dc.contributor.authorNeil, Helen
dc.contributor.authorNodder, Scott D
dc.date.accessioned2015-12-07T22:48:57Z
dc.identifier.issn0883-8305
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/1885/26548
dc.description.abstractThe zinc concentration of siliceous sponge spicules was determined from spicules recovered from four sediment cores spanning the last 160 kyr, from the Campbell Plateau region southeast of New Zealand. Zinc/Si results showed little difference between Holocene and glacial aged spicules. An increase in Zn/Si was observed for core Y14, where Zn/Si peaked at about 0.6 μmol/mol during marine isotope stages 5a-5b. To better understand the role carbon export has on sponge Zn/Si, we explored the strong relationship observed between surficial sediment particulate organic carbon (POC) and the Zn/Si of sponge silica and related this to sediment trap POC flux estimates. Conversion of the Zn/ Si records to benthic POC fluxes suggests that there has been little change in the amount of POC reaching Campbell Plateau sediments over the past 30 kyr. These results suggest that surface productivity over the Campbell Plateau has remained relatively low over the past 160 kyr and suggests that glacial productivity was not significantly higher than the present day. Finally, this work reveals that living marine sponges appear to act as the biological equivalents of moored sediment traps, recording the flux of POC to the seafloor by archiving zinc associated with sinking POC in the growing silica skeleton.
dc.publisherAmerican Geophysical Union
dc.sourcePaleoceanography
dc.subjectKeywords: Holocene; organic carbon; paleoceanography; Pleistocene; sediment transport; suspended sediment; zinc; Australasia; Eastern Hemisphere; New Zealand; World
dc.titleReconstruction of paleo-particulate organic carbon fluxes for the Campbell Plateau region of southern New Zealand using the zinc content of sponge spicules
dc.typeJournal article
local.description.notesImported from ARIES
local.identifier.citationvolume20
dc.date.issued2005
local.identifier.absfor040202 - Inorganic Geochemistry
local.identifier.absfor040607 - Surface Processes
local.identifier.ariespublicationu4353633xPUB45
local.type.statusPublished Version
local.contributor.affiliationEllwood, Michael, College of Physical and Mathematical Sciences, ANU
local.contributor.affiliationKelly, Michelle , National Institute of Water and Atmospheric Research
local.contributor.affiliationNeil, Helen, National Institute of Water and Atmospheric Research
local.contributor.affiliationNodder, Scott D, National Institute of Water and Atmospheric Research
local.description.embargo2037-12-31
local.bibliographicCitation.issue3
local.bibliographicCitation.startpage1
local.bibliographicCitation.lastpage15
local.identifier.doi10.1029/2004PA001095
dc.date.updated2015-12-07T12:04:09Z
local.identifier.scopusID2-s2.0-27744488812
CollectionsANU Research Publications

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