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Political Economy Dynamics in the Arab Gulf States: Implications for Political Transition

Gray, Matthew

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Political science predicts that monarchies lack the flexibility to modernize without losing power: "the king's dilemma." Yet, Gulf regimes are remarkably durable, strengthened by late-stage rentierism, entrepreneurial state capitalism, careful globalization, elite-based networks, and political narratives to manage state-society interactions. These characteristics impede socioeconomic or political reform and democratization, as political and commercial elites have strong incentives for...[Show more]

dc.contributor.authorGray, Matthew
dc.contributor.editorSaikal, A
dc.date.accessioned2022-05-16T05:17:21Z
dc.identifier.isbn9781137561244
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/1885/265430
dc.description.abstractPolitical science predicts that monarchies lack the flexibility to modernize without losing power: "the king's dilemma." Yet, Gulf regimes are remarkably durable, strengthened by late-stage rentierism, entrepreneurial state capitalism, careful globalization, elite-based networks, and political narratives to manage state-society interactions. These characteristics impede socioeconomic or political reform and democratization, as political and commercial elites have strong incentives for continuity. Rents provide freedom from accountability, reciprocity, or negotiation with society. But the Gulf elites are still not autonomous, in fact embedded in and reliant upon society. Revolution or political unrest remains a threat. Yet, this chapter argues that despite recent developments, as long as Gulf rentier wealth and state capitalism prove beneficial, monarchies will maintain the co-optive, repressive, and regulatory capacity to avoid substantial political change.
dc.format.mimetypeapplication/pdf
dc.language.isoen_AU
dc.publisherPalgrave Macmillan
dc.relation.ispartofThe Arab World and Iran: A turbulent region in transition
dc.relation.isversionof1st Edition
dc.rights© 2016 The authors
dc.subjectPolitical Economy
dc.subjectSaudi Arabia
dc.subjectMiddle East
dc.subjectUnited Arab Emirate
dc.subjectPolitical Elite
dc.titlePolitical Economy Dynamics in the Arab Gulf States: Implications for Political Transition
dc.typeBook chapter
local.description.notesImported from ARIES
dc.date.issued2016
local.identifier.absfor160607 - International Relations
local.identifier.ariespublicationu4334722xPUB236
local.publisher.urlhttps://link.springer.com/
local.type.statusMetadata only
local.contributor.affiliationGray, Matthew, College of Arts and Social Sciences, ANU
local.description.embargo2099-12-31
local.bibliographicCitation.startpage45
local.bibliographicCitation.lastpage65
local.identifier.doi10.1057/978-1-137-55966-1_4
dc.date.updated2020-12-27T07:31:06Z
local.bibliographicCitation.placeofpublicationNew York
CollectionsANU Research Publications

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