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Prehistoric Vegeculture and Social Life in Island Southeast Asia and Melanesia

Denham, Tim; Barton, Huw

Description

Does it make sense to understand the prehistory, history and present-day patterns of life in Southeast Asia in terms of a distinction between two ways of life: "farming" and "foraging"? This is the central question addressed by the anthropologists and archaeologists contributing to this volume. Inherent within the question "Why Cultivate?" are people's relationships with the physical world: are they primarily to do with subsistence and economics or with social and/or cultural forces? The...[Show more]

dc.contributor.authorDenham, Tim
dc.contributor.authorBarton, Huw
dc.contributor.editorBarker, G. J
dc.contributor.editorJanowski, M
dc.date.accessioned2022-05-16T04:08:38Z
dc.identifier.isbn9781902937588
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/1885/265424
dc.description.abstractDoes it make sense to understand the prehistory, history and present-day patterns of life in Southeast Asia in terms of a distinction between two ways of life: "farming" and "foraging"? This is the central question addressed by the anthropologists and archaeologists contributing to this volume. Inherent within the question "Why Cultivate?" are people's relationships with the physical world: are they primarily to do with subsistence and economics or with social and/or cultural forces? The answers given by the contributors are complex. On a practical level they argue that there is a continuum rather than a sharp break between different levels of management of the environment, but rice-growing usually represents a profound break in people's relations to their cultural and symbolic landscapes. An associated point made by the archaeologists is that the "deep histories" of foraging-farming lifeways that are emerging in this region sit uncomfortably with the theory that foraging was replaced by farming in the mid Holocene as a result of a migration of Austronesian-speaking Neolithic farmers from southern China and Taiwan.
dc.description.sponsorshipHB was funded by a Wellcome Trust Award during the writing of this paper and TD by the Australian Research Council and Monash Research Fellowships. We would like to thank: Kara Valle and Phil Scamp for drafting the figures; John Muke for his thoughts on the correspondences between vegeculture and social practices among peoples of the Wahgi valley of Papua New Guinea; Robin Torrence, Neil Christie, and Leslie McFadyen for comments on earlier drafts; and Graeme Barker and Jean Kennedy for their thoughtful reviews.
dc.format.mimetypeapplication/pdf
dc.language.isoen_AU
dc.publisherMcDonald Institute for Archaeological Research
dc.relation.ispartofWhy cultivate?: anthropological and archaeological approaches to foraging-farming transitions in Southeast Asia
dc.relation.isversionof1 Edition
dc.rights© 2011 The authors
dc.titlePrehistoric Vegeculture and Social Life in Island Southeast Asia and Melanesia
dc.typeBook chapter
local.description.notesImported from ARIES
dc.date.issued2011
local.identifier.absfor210106 - Archaeology of New Guinea and Pacific Islands (excl. New Zealand)
local.identifier.ariespublicationu4326120xPUB629
local.publisher.urlhttps://www.oxbowbooks.com/
local.type.statusMetadata only
local.contributor.affiliationDenham, Tim, College of Arts and Social Sciences, ANU
local.contributor.affiliationBarton, Huw, University of Leicester
local.description.embargo2099-12-31
local.bibliographicCitation.startpage17
local.bibliographicCitation.lastpage25
local.identifier.absseo970121 - Expanding Knowledge in History and Archaeology
dc.date.updated2020-12-27T07:30:46Z
local.bibliographicCitation.placeofpublicationUnited Kingdom
CollectionsANU Research Publications

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