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Neural mechanisms underlying spatial realignment during adaptation to optical wedge prisms

Chapman, Heidi; Eramudugolla, Ranmalee; Gavrilescu, Maria; Strudwick, Mark; Loftus, Andrea; Cunnington, Ross C; Mattingley, Jason

Description

Visuomotor adaptation to a shift in visual input produced by prismatic lenses is an example of dynamic sensory-motor plasticity within the brain. Prism adaptation is readily induced in healthy individuals, and is thought to reflect the brain's ability to compensate for drifts in spatial calibration between different sensory systems. The neural correlate of this form of functional plasticity is largely unknown, although current models predict the involvement of parieto-cerebellar circuits....[Show more]

dc.contributor.authorChapman, Heidi
dc.contributor.authorEramudugolla, Ranmalee
dc.contributor.authorGavrilescu, Maria
dc.contributor.authorStrudwick, Mark
dc.contributor.authorLoftus, Andrea
dc.contributor.authorCunnington, Ross C
dc.contributor.authorMattingley, Jason
dc.date.accessioned2022-01-14T00:32:02Z
dc.identifier.issn0028-3932
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/1885/258412
dc.description.abstractVisuomotor adaptation to a shift in visual input produced by prismatic lenses is an example of dynamic sensory-motor plasticity within the brain. Prism adaptation is readily induced in healthy individuals, and is thought to reflect the brain's ability to compensate for drifts in spatial calibration between different sensory systems. The neural correlate of this form of functional plasticity is largely unknown, although current models predict the involvement of parieto-cerebellar circuits. Recent studies that have employed event-related functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) to identify brain regions associated with prism adaptation have discovered patterns of parietal and cerebellar modulation as participants corrected their visuomotor errors during the early part of adaptation. However, the role of these regions in the later stage of adaptation, when ‘spatial realignment’ or true adaptation is predicted to occur, remains unclear. Here, we used fMRI to quantify the distinctive patterns of parieto-cerebellar activity as visuomotor adaptation develops. We directly contrasted activation patterns during the initial error correction phase of visuomotor adaptation with that during the later spatial realignment phase, and found significant recruitment of the parieto-cerebellar network – with activations in the right inferior parietal lobe and the right posterior cerebellum. These findings provide the first evidence of both cerebellar and parietal involvement during the spatial realignment phase of prism adaptation.
dc.description.sponsorshipThis research was supported by grants from ANZ Trustees (H.C. and J.B.M) and the National Health and Medical Research Council (Australia) (J.B.M. and R.E.).
dc.format.mimetypeapplication/pdf
dc.language.isoen_AU
dc.publisherPergamon Press
dc.rights© 2010 The Authors
dc.sourceNeuropsychologia
dc.subjectPrism adaptation
dc.subjectSpatial cognition
dc.subjectParietal lobe
dc.subjectCerebellum
dc.subjectSpatial realignment
dc.subjectError correction
dc.subjectfMRI
dc.titleNeural mechanisms underlying spatial realignment during adaptation to optical wedge prisms
dc.typeJournal article
local.description.notesImported from ARIES
local.identifier.citationvolume48
dc.date.issued2010
local.identifier.absfor111714 - Mental Health
local.identifier.absfor111706 - Epidemiology
local.identifier.absfor111702 - Aged Health Care
local.identifier.ariespublicationU3488905xPUB20249
local.publisher.urlhttps://www.sciencedirect.com/
local.type.statusPublished Version
local.contributor.affiliationChapman, Heidi, University of Birmingham
local.contributor.affiliationEramudugolla, Ranmalee, College of Health and Medicine, ANU
local.contributor.affiliationGavrilescu, Maria, University of Melbourne
local.contributor.affiliationStrudwick, Mark, University of Queensland
local.contributor.affiliationLoftus, Andrea, University of Western Australia
local.contributor.affiliationCunnington , Ross C, University of Queensland
local.contributor.affiliationMattingley, Jason, University of Queensland
local.description.embargo2099-12-31
local.bibliographicCitation.issue9
local.bibliographicCitation.startpage2595
local.bibliographicCitation.lastpage2601
local.identifier.doi10.1016/j.neuropsychologia.2010.05.006
dc.date.updated2020-12-06T07:20:28Z
local.identifier.scopusID2-s2.0-77954456144
local.identifier.thomsonID000280573300020
CollectionsANU Research Publications

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