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The 'Conventionalisation' Thesis Reconsidered: Structural and Ideological Transformation of Australian Organic Agriculture

Lockie, Stewart; Halpin, Darren

Description

In contrast with the uncritical optimism of popular narratives on organic food and agriculture, social scientists have debated at length the potential for the organic food sector to 'conventionalise'; that is, to transform from an oppositional social movement promoting fundamentally different agroecologies and social relationships into a highly regulated and capital intensive food industry differing little from its conventional counterparts. Often, this is argued to result in a 'bifurcation'...[Show more]

dc.contributor.authorLockie, Stewart
dc.contributor.authorHalpin, Darren
dc.date.accessioned2015-12-07T22:46:24Z
dc.identifier.issn0038-0199
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/1885/25762
dc.description.abstractIn contrast with the uncritical optimism of popular narratives on organic food and agriculture, social scientists have debated at length the potential for the organic food sector to 'conventionalise'; that is, to transform from an oppositional social movement promoting fundamentally different agroecologies and social relationships into a highly regulated and capital intensive food industry differing little from its conventional counterparts. Often, this is argued to result in a 'bifurcation' between industrial organic producers and a residual of small, artisanal social movement activists. Data from surveys of 397 certified organic and 434 conventional farmers in Australia call into question, however, the tendency of the bifurcation model to dichotomise small and large producers in this manner. Despite considerable polarisation in the economic scale of organic producers, there was no evidence that larger organic producers held significantly different values and beliefs to smaller organic growers. Nor were larger organic growers poised to capture greater market share through faster rates of expansion, or any less likely to support local consumption through sales direct to consumers.
dc.publisherEuropean Society for Rural Sociology
dc.sourceSociologia Ruralis
dc.subjectKeywords: agricultural economics; consumption behavior; econometrics; food industry; ideology; social movement; Australasia; Australia
dc.titleThe 'Conventionalisation' Thesis Reconsidered: Structural and Ideological Transformation of Australian Organic Agriculture
dc.typeJournal article
local.description.notesImported from ARIES
local.identifier.citationvolume45
dc.date.issued2005
local.identifier.absfor160802 - Environmental Sociology
local.identifier.ariespublicationu4578276xPUB40
local.type.statusPublished Version
local.contributor.affiliationLockie, Stewart, College of Arts and Social Sciences, ANU
local.contributor.affiliationHalpin, Darren, Robert Gordon University
local.description.embargo2037-12-31
local.bibliographicCitation.issue4
local.bibliographicCitation.startpage284
local.bibliographicCitation.lastpage307
local.identifier.doi10.1111/j.1467-9523.2005.00306.x
local.identifier.absseo960702 - Consumption Patterns, Population Issues and the Environment
dc.date.updated2015-12-07T11:41:14Z
local.identifier.scopusID2-s2.0-33747077173
CollectionsANU Research Publications

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