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The WHO 2016 verbal autopsy instrument: An international standard suitable for automated analysis by InterVA, InSilicoVA, and Tariff 2.0

Nichols, Erin K.; Byass, Peter; Chandromohan, Daniel; Clark, Samuel J.; Flaxman, Abraham D; Jakob, Robert; Leitao, Jordanao; Maire, Nicolas; Rao, Chalapati; Riley, Ian; Setel, Philip W.

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Background Verbal autopsy (VA) is a practical method for determining probable causes of death at the population level in places where systems for medical certification of cause of death are weak. VA methods suitable for use in routine settings, such as civil registration and vital statistics (CRVS) systems, have developed rapidly in the last decade. These developments have been part of a growing global momentum to strengthen CRVS systems in low-income countries. With this momentum have come...[Show more]

dc.contributor.authorNichols, Erin K.
dc.contributor.authorByass, Peter
dc.contributor.authorChandromohan, Daniel
dc.contributor.authorClark, Samuel J.
dc.contributor.authorFlaxman, Abraham D
dc.contributor.authorJakob, Robert
dc.contributor.authorLeitao, Jordanao
dc.contributor.authorMaire, Nicolas
dc.contributor.authorRao, Chalapati
dc.contributor.authorRiley, Ian
dc.contributor.authorSetel, Philip W.
dc.date.accessioned2021-12-16T04:57:17Z
dc.date.available2021-12-16T04:57:17Z
dc.identifier.issn1549-1277
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/1885/256623
dc.description.abstractBackground Verbal autopsy (VA) is a practical method for determining probable causes of death at the population level in places where systems for medical certification of cause of death are weak. VA methods suitable for use in routine settings, such as civil registration and vital statistics (CRVS) systems, have developed rapidly in the last decade. These developments have been part of a growing global momentum to strengthen CRVS systems in low-income countries. With this momentum have come pressure for continued research and development of VA methods and the need for a single standard VA instrument on which multiple automated diagnostic methods can be developed. Methods and findings In 2016, partners harmonized a WHO VA standard instrument that fully incorporates the indicators necessary to run currently available automated diagnostic algorithms. The WHO 2016 VA instrument, together with validated approaches to analyzing VA data, offers countries solutions to improving information about patterns of cause-specific mortality. This VA instrument offers the opportunity to harmonize the automated diagnostic algorithms in the future. Conclusions Despite all improvements in design and technology, VA is only recommended where medical certification of cause of death is not possible. The method can nevertheless provide sufficient information to guide public health priorities in communities in which physician certification of deaths is largely unavailable. The WHO 2016 VA instrument, together with validated approaches to analyzing VA data, offers countries solutions to improving information about patterns of cause-specific mortality.
dc.description.sponsorshipThe World Health Organization, Bill & Melinda Gates Foundation, and Bloomberg Philanthropies, under the Data for Health Initiative, funded the technical work and making the work publicly available. NM was partially supported by the World Health Organization under an Agreement of Performance of Work grant number 2015/ 535961 awarded to the Swiss Tropical and Public Health Institute, Basel, Switzerland. SJC was partially supported by the Bill & Melinda Gates Foundation grant number OPP1082114 awarded to the London School of Hygiene & Tropical Medicine, London, UK, with a subcontract to the University of Washington, Seattle, US. The funders had no role in study design, data collection and analysis, decision to publish, or preparation of the manuscript.
dc.format.mimetypeapplication/pdf
dc.language.isoen_AU
dc.publisherPublic Library of Science
dc.rights© 2018 The Authors
dc.rights.urihttp://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/3.0/igo/
dc.sourcePLoS Medicine
dc.titleThe WHO 2016 verbal autopsy instrument: An international standard suitable for automated analysis by InterVA, InSilicoVA, and Tariff 2.0
dc.typeJournal article
local.description.notesImported from ARIES
local.identifier.citationvolume15
dc.date.issued2018
local.identifier.absfor111706 - Epidemiology
local.identifier.absfor160508 - Health Policy
local.identifier.ariespublicationu5684624xPUB263
local.publisher.urlhttps://journals.plos.org/plosmedicine
local.type.statusPublished Version
local.contributor.affiliationNichols, Erin K., National Center for Health Statistics, Centers for Disease Control and Prevention
local.contributor.affiliationByass, Peter, Umeå University
local.contributor.affiliationChandromohan, Daniel, London School of Hygiene & Tropical Medicine
local.contributor.affiliationClark, Samuel J., Ohio State University
local.contributor.affiliationFlaxman, Abraham D, University of Washington
local.contributor.affiliationJakob, Robert, World Health Organization (WHO)
local.contributor.affiliationLeitao, Jordanao, World Health Organization (WHO)
local.contributor.affiliationMaire, Nicolas, Swiss Tropical and Public Health Institute
local.contributor.affiliationRao, Chalapati, College of Health and Medicine, ANU
local.contributor.affiliationRiley, Ian, University of Melbourne
local.contributor.affiliationSetel, Philip W., Vital Strategies
local.bibliographicCitation.issue1
local.bibliographicCitation.startpagee1002486
local.identifier.doi10.1371/journal.pmed.1002486
dc.date.updated2020-11-23T11:59:27Z
dcterms.accessRightsopen access
dc.rights.licenseCreative Commons Attribution 3.0 Public License.
CollectionsANU Research Publications

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